Category Archives: Volcanoes

Pigeon English

Pigeon English book

Did our feathered friend come in to read this one?!

Good evening, fellow Bookworms!

Not every day you get a pigeon flying in to a bookshop, but it was a little too late for book club if that’s what it came in for! I was actually coming down the stairs at Waterstone’s Deansgate with a couple of books and heading for the tills to make an enquiry about another book I was interested in, when a pigeon flew in to the store from the main entrance on Deansgate! I shit you not! Doors open, a few human customers come in to browse, and a damn pigeon flies in and perches on top of a set of bookshelves at the other end of the store! As a member of staff goes over to the bird, it takes off again, whooshing past yours truly (still on the stairs and gobsmacked at what I’m witnessing here) and perches on a handrail near the first floor!

I then headed to the checkout to ask about my third book, which a member of staff went off to find for me, so I guess the pigeon was at least on the first floor somewhere, and staff were fetching ladders and stuff in order to assist the pigeon out of the shop! It was still there when I was paying for my books and leaving the shop, so I hope the staff did manage to help it on its way back out into the glorious warm evening here in Manchester! As I said when I was paying for my reading matter, maybe it came in for a read. Perhaps the Stephen Kelman novel, Pigeon English?!

Anyway, back to book club matters… The Peculiar Life of a Lonely Postman had a mixed reception from those of us at the meeting, some of us liking it, but some thought it was awful. Personally, I quite enjoyed it, it was a pretty quick read, too, but I did want to slap one of Bilodo’s colleagues, so Robert joined the Literary Slap List. Our next book is The Power, by Naomi Alderman, which is supposed to be sci-fi or dystopia about women being in charge and having actual electrical power over the blokes. To me, that only sounds like dystopia if you’re a bloke! Our next meeting is 12th July, which, funnily enough, reminds me of a book, or rather a series, which I read when I was a teenager! The series is by Joan Lingard, best known as the Kevin and Sadie series, and the first book of that series is The Twelfth Day of July.

I also bought Hot Milk, by Deborah Levy, which comes recommended by Emma who works at Waterstone’s and runs the book club, and the book I was making an enquiry about, which was Republic Or Death!: Travels In Search of National Anthems, by Alex Marshall. I had looked around for that one myself, but it’s a bit tricky when a book’s subject matter could put it in a number of categories! I looked in music, as it was about national anthems, I looked in politics, I looked in history… When I gave up and went to ask at the counter, the Waterstone’s employee who found the book for me said he’d found it under Travel Writing! It should have been in world history, so I was actually right in looking in the history department! I’d seen the book in hardback a while ago, at the Trafford Centre branch, and it looked like the sort of book I’d enjoy!

The national anthems book will have to join the waiting list for the OC List, though. Need to get at least a couple of non-fictions off the list to get a new one on there, as the next non-fiction to be finished needs to be replaced by a general fiction book. I am going to have to decide what to do about Book Club Books, as they are obviously a priority, providing I enjoy them enough to read beyond the first 10% of any given book! Maybe I might have to have it as an extra 10th OC book regardless of genre.

If the Book Club Book (hereafter BCB) is short enough to be read quickly, it doesn’t even need to go on the OC List at all.

If the BCB is not my cup of tea, I shall leave it unfinished and it won’t go on the OC List.

If the BCB IS my cup of tea and I read it in its entirity, it goes on the OC List as a 10th book regardless of whether it’s fiction, non-fiction, YA or whatever! The other nine on the OC List shall be 3 general fiction, 3 non-fiction, and 3 Young Adult once I have got that balance adjusted!

Therefore, I could start The Power now, and get on with it, and still have 9 others on the OC List, even if I enjoy The Power and read beyond the first 10 percent of it, which is my criteria for it going on the OC List in the first place. The ten percent thing, as I mentioned a few blogs ago, is my literary insurance policy against books which don’t float my boat!

Hot Milk could possibly be one of the general fiction ones to be read next once a suitable vacancy arises on the OC List, although I still plan to start one of my “chunky monkeys”, possibly The Pillars of the Earth, by Ken Follett. The national anthems book will join the list of non-fiction books on the waiting list, but when a suitable vacancy arises, I shall be resuming Manchester, England, by Dave Haslam, and using the bee bookmark I stitched recently to keep my place in it.

I’ve got my eye on these two for future acquisition…

The above books are on my radar! I think I’ve alluded to The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck before now, pretty sure I mentioned it in at least one blog earlier this year, or at least the concept of it, but The Last Volcano was new to me when I spotted it tonight while looking around for that book about national anthems which I mentioned earlier! Thanks to my dad and a late night Open University programme donkey’s years ago when I was about 7 or 8, I have had a fascination for volcanoes for most of my life, as I have definitely mentioned in several book blogs over the years since I started blogging in the summer of 2010! Check my archives, and I’m pretty sure there are several entries which mention our lava-spewing chums and my interest in them since I was in the juniors at primary school.

Before I wrap this up and get it published, I think I’d better mention that I posted a recent blog entry on a book group on Facebook the other day as someone was asking if any of us wrote book blogs, so I posted the link to mine. I have warned them I am very waffly and random, though, lol! I currently have 54 followers, 54 brave souls who put up with my epic drivel every time I send one of these things to be published, but it could possibly attract one or two more intrepid bookworms who are willing to sift through all the randomness and football mentions to find the book-related stuff! Talking of football, Victor Lindelof has become our first signing of the summer, a Swedish central defender nicknamed The Iceman. I look forward to seeing him in action!

Anyway, I shall call it a day for now, so until the next time, take care and Happy Reading!

Joanne x x x

Books mentioned in this blog entry…

  • Pigeon English – Stephen Kelman
  • The Peculiar Life of a Lonely Postman  – Denis Thériault
  • The Power – Naomi Alderman
  • The Twelfth Day of July – Joan Lingard
  • Hot Milk – Deborah Levy
  • Republic Or Death! Travels In Search of National Anthems – Alex Marshall
  • The Pillars of the Earth – Ken Follett
  • Manchester, England – Dave Haslam
  • The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck – Mark Manson
  • The Last Volcano – John Dvorak

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Filed under Books, Football, Literary Slap List, Manc Stuff!, Music, Non-Fiction, Ongoing Concerns, Television, The TBR Pile, Travel, Volcanoes, YA Books

Get The Balance Right

Zlatan book finished April 2017

Hello again, fellow Bookworms!

As you can see, Zlatan is at 100% Yes, another book completed in 2017! Number 18 for this year on the Goodreads Challenge, and thus OFF the list of Ongoing Concerns! Mr Ibrahimović‘s autobiography will now be handed over to my sister so she can read it. I believe in marking off my OCs as being 100% read on my board before I take them off the list and move other books up.

I was dithering about what to add next, other than knowing it really should be some non-fiction to replace the non-fiction I have just finished, but then I remembered that blog from a couple of months ago about my half-finished tour biography of the Pet Shop Boys, and that I’d said on here I was going to finish that book as part of my celebrations of having been a Pethead for 30 years this year! Therefore, Pet Shop Boys, Literally, by Chris Heath, joins the OCs! As I said at the time, the book is already 50% read, so it is literally a Half-Read Book! It joins the list somewhere in the middle. An Equal Music, by Vikram Seth, resumes top spot on 78% now that our Swedish hero is off the list.

So, we’re back to 9 books on the OC List, of which 7 are fiction and 2 are non-fiction, bringing us on to the matter at hand and the title of tonight’s blog, which is, of course, a song by Depeche Mode, as fans of 80s music will no doubt know! The issue being that I feel I need a better balance between fiction and non-fiction on my list. The factual stuff is being outnumbered, which doesn’t seem very fair as I enjoy a good factual read as much as I enjoy a good story! Always have done since I was a kid! I am thinking, therefore, that even if the next one or two books to be finished and come off the OC list are fiction, they will be replaced on there by factual tomes! I feel I should have at least 3, if not 4, non-fiction books if I’m going to have 8 or 9 books on the OC list as a whole. It needs to be more even!

Once that is up and running, and I do have a better balance, we can have like-for-like books coming off the “substitutes’ bench” so to speak. I can certainly see some Bill Bryson being added to the OC list in the near future. I had thought about Mother Tongue, but that might not go on the OC list, as I was so near to finishing that book when I last read it that it would not take much to get it finished off, thus there is very little point in adding it to the list for just a day or two! Like with the really quick reads, I see very little point in adding certain books to the OC List – an Ongoing Concern is a book that’s going to take me more than a day or two to read, or to finish off if it is already partially-read!

There WILL be some Bryson, and it will happen fairly soon, but it’s more likely to be Down Under, Neither Here Nor There, or The Road To Little Dribbling which is added to the OC List when I need another dose of non-fiction adding to it. There will be at least a bit more Stuart Maconie, too. I have Hope & Glory lined up to be read at some point once I’ve finished The People’s Songs. I’m going to have to look to see if I own a copy of Cider With Roadies, also by Maconie, and I hope I do! He also wrote a book called Adventures On the High Teas, but I don’t own a copy of that at present. No rush as yet – let’s get my existing Maconie books read first!

John Cleese‘s autobiography, So, Anyway, is lurking in an accessible part of my room, on one of my book piles, so that is another distinct possibility! Should be pretty funny knowing Cleese! It would also be the perfect excuse to make plenty of Monty Python references in this blog. Not that I need an excuse to go all Pythonesque on you, lol!

What do we have here, lurking around Computer Corner? Hmmm…. Maarten Meijer‘s biography of Louis van Gaal, one of my half-read books. I liked Louis and wish he’d been retained to see out his three years. I still don’t like Jose Mourinho. At all. Yeah, alright, he’s good in the transfer market, but the cons outweigh the pros, and he really should STOP criticising players in public! That is NOT the United way! It is also crap man-management! If you have to give a player a bollocking, you do it in private, in your office! That’s how Fergie did it, and that’s why he was so successful! 26 and a half years as our manager, 13 league titles, 5 FA Cups, 4 League Cups, 1 European Cup-Winners’ Cup and 2 European Cups… and his reign only came to an end due to retirement.

Fergie defended his players in public, even at the expense of the media giving him a load of shit for it, but that is how he retained their loyalty and got so much out of them. He NEVER rubbished his players in the press or on telly! Also, he knew the players should get the credit and the attention far more than him, and he accepted that! Jose needs to stop being such an arrogant, egotistical little twat!

There is only one person on earth I can think of with an ego even bigger than that of Jose Mourinho, and that is a certain Tango-tinted twat who is, unfortunately, currently residing in the White House…

I would say that Jose has all the man-management skills of a dead gnat, but that would be far too harsh on the poor gnat!

Anyway, enough about that arrogant arsehole, and back to the books…

Also lurking near Computer Corner, we have The Year of Reading Dangerously, by Andy Miller. This has been one of the notorious Duplicate Books, of course, but one copy is being offloaded soon. However, that still means I will have one copy for my reading pleasure when I eventually get around to it. We also have How To Teach Quantum Physics To Your Dog, by Chad Orzel. I know bugger all about quantum physics, I only got a D for bog standard physics when I did my GCSEs at high school, lol, and that was way back in 1989, 28 years ago, but maybe reading this would help me understand more scientific stuff in an entertaining way?

I wasn’t completely useless at science, unlike PE, but I wasn’t brilliant at it either. My dad was the scientific bod in our family – my best subjects at high school were music and foreign languages, followed fairly closely by history and literature.

Still on the science books front, there’s a partially-read copy of Periodic Tales, by Hugh Aldersey-Williams, which I think is downstairs in our living room. I could always resume that one if my quest for more non-fiction and a more even balance of reading matter on my OC list calls for more science, although that would be chemistry, not physics. Chemistry really would be my dad’s area of expertise! However, as I’ve mentioned in previous blogs, one area of interest for me, which my dad got me into when I was young, is volcanoes, so I could always get round to reading Krakatoa: The Day The World Exploded, by Simon Winchester. A tiny little bit of it has been read, some time ago, but only about the first 11 pages, so we can start again from scratch, really.

Anyway, I think that has drawn up a decent list of non-fiction ideas for future additions to the OC List when I need factual reads to be added! It also brings to an end this blog entry, so I shall get it finished off and published. Until next time, take care, have a Happy Easter, and Happy Reading!

Joanne x x x

Books mentioned in this blog entry…

  • I Am Zlatan Ibrahimović – Zlatan Ibrahimović
  • Pet Shop Boys, Literally – Chris Heath
  • An Equal Music – Vikram Seth
  • Mother Tongue – Bill Bryson
  • Down Under – Bill Bryson
  • Neither Here Nor There – Bill Bryson
  • The Road To Little Dribbling – Bill Bryson
  • Hope & Glory – Stuart Maconie
  • The People’s Songs – Stuart Maconie
  • Cider With Roadies – Stuart Maconie
  • Adventures On the High Teas – Stuart Maconie
  • So, Anyway – John Cleese
  • Louis van Gaal: The Biography – Maarten Meijer
  • The Year of Reading Dangerously – Andy Miller
  • How To Teach Quantum Physics To Your Dog – Chad Orzel
  • Periodic Tales – Hugh Aldersey-Williams
  • Krakatoa: The Day The World Exploded – Simon Winchester

 

 

 

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Filed under Arsehole Politicians, Autobiography/Biography, Books, Computer Corner, Duplicate Books List, Football, Goodreads, Half-Finished Books, Handbag Books, Humour, Music, Non-Fiction, Ongoing Concerns, Rants, Sports, Travel, Volcanoes, YA Books

A Tale of Two Copies

all the light we cannot see

Good afternoon, fellow Bookworms!

It was a charity shop bargain. Only a quid. At that price, it’s worth it to risk it for a biscuit! I firmly believe I already have a copy, but it’s in the Missing Books List, as mentioned a few blogs ago, lol, and so All The Light We Cannot See, by Anthony Doerr, also joins the notorious Duplicate Books List. That’s how some of my others on that list came to be on it… because I either thought I’d lost it or given it away to a charity shop, or that I had it but not in a place I could put my hands on it easily, so I went and bought a copy cheaply at one of the local charity shops around here, and then the original copy turns up eventually, and I have two of them… The Sisters Brothers, by Patrick deWitt, ended up on the Duplicate Books List in this manner!

So, having bought the Doerr novel, I was wondering where the original was, decided to make a certain part of my wardrobe unit accessible by shifting the stuff in front of it… I open the door and find out that Shakespeare, by Bill Bryson, now needs to join the Duplicate Books List! Aargh! And it’s not the only Bryson book of which I have two copies, either! I have two copies of The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid, too! So, I think we now have n-n-n-n-nineteen books on the Duplicate Books List! Oh dear!

Yes, just checked. I have found my Word document from this time last year, when I listed my 17 duplicate books, so we do have 19 now, and they are as follows…

  • The Year of Reading Dangerously – Andy Miller
  • The Master and Margarita – Mikhail Bulgakov
  • The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas – John Boyne
  • Attention All Shipping – Charlie Connelly
  • The Joy Luck Club – Amy Tan
  • Anita and Me – Meera Syal
  • Manual of the Warrior of Light – Paulo Coelho
  • The Bone Clocks – David Mitchell
  • The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid – Bill Bryson
  • The Sisters Brothers – Patrick deWitt
  • The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency – Alexander McCall Smith
  • The Rotters’ Club – Jonathan Coe
  • A Passage To India – E. M. Forster
  • Lady Chatterley’s Lover – D. H. Lawrence
  • The Notebook – Nicholas Sparks
  • The Periodic Table – Primo Levi
  • A Tale of Two Cities – Charles Dickens
  • All The Light We Cannot See – Anthony Doerr
  • Shakespeare – Bill Bryson

Some were different editions with different covers, so I was completely unaware that I already had a copy – The Year of Reading Dangerously, and Lady Chatterley’s Lover definitely come into that category.  Saw them on offer, couldn’t resist, completely unaware of the fact that these very books were already amongst the reading matter in my room, and then I eventually discover that I have two copies of the same damn book… Oh bugger!

The Joy Luck Club, by Amy Tan, was a half-read book from my student days, so I probably thought I’d given my first copy away to a book sale at work when Mum and I were moving house to our present address in 2006 and I had to have a major cull of my books. Thus I was VERY surprised to find that I still had my first copy!

Usually, at the end of my blog, I list the books I’ve mentioned in that blog, but I’m not going to do that with this one, as I’ve already listed them above. So, unless I mention any books which are not on the Duplicate Books List, you’ll have to refer to the list above. There might be one or two if I mention my Ongoing Concerns, but there’s unlikely to be a big list as I’ve already done that for this blog and I’m not bloody listing them all at the end as well! I’m no parrot- I’m not repeating myself!

Some blog news now, and a guy called Jack Faivish commented on my last blog, Tuesday Night’s Alright (For Reading), inviting me to contribute to his blog, tvandcity, which was very kind of him, although I suspect my televisual interests are very retro and I’m not really into much in terms of current telly! I’m not a fan of much stuff which is on the box these days – far too much rubbish which doesn’t appeal to me at all!

When I tend to mention telly, the only current stuff I usually bother with is Pointless, Masterchef, footy matches, occasional other sports (usually the Olympics and Winter Olympics when those are on), and music videos. Maybe a documentary every now and then if it’s something which interests me, such as volcanoes, but that’s not really a lot, is it? Besides which, I don’t watch soap operas, I don’t watch most reality tv shows, I don’t watch those serials from the States which are always being plugged on Channel 5, Sky One or Sky Atlantic… I really don’t follow anything like that, so I doubt I’d be of any use to a television blog unless they are into the old stuff from the 70s and 80s, when I was a kid, there weren’t many channels, but what was on them was much better than the crap we see today!

And today’s stuff is too dumbed-down for the most part. People called the television the “idiot box” when I was younger, but it really is in this day and age. At least when I was a kid, you had a lot more informative stuff on the box, particularly when BBC2 showed Open University programmes late at night and at weekends! My dad used to watch loads of those! Now, the OU is online, but they’re not on telly any more, adding to the sense that there’s little of any real value on the box. Then again, that means I’m not missing much by reading instead!

“I find television to be very educational. Every time someone switches on the set, I go in another room and read a book!” – Groucho Marx.

Right, anyway, back to books of which I only own ONE copy, at least as far as I’m aware, lol! An Equal Music now heads the Ongoing Concerns charts and completion level is now at 78% so it shouldn’t be too long before that particular “chunky” has been read. The number of OCs is currently 6, as Me and Earl and the Dying Girl, by Jesse Andrews, has been added to the list. I had a cursory read the other night, liked what I read, and decided that it should join the list. I must like nerdy lads in YA novels, lol, as I liked Colin Singleton in An Abundance of Katherines, by John Green, when I read that one last year, and Greg Gaines makes me lol for pretty similar reasons. I don’t think he’s quite as geeky as Colin, but he’s definitely a nerd, and that seems to amuse me.

The geek shall inherit the earth!

Well, maybe, maybe not, lol, but certainly the act of having a geeky character in a book seems to appeal to me. Audrey’s brother, Frank, in Finding Audrey, by Sophie Kinsella, also makes me laugh, and he’s definitely a geek!

More books may well be added to the OC list fairly soon, but at the moment, we have six on there while I decide which of my countless unread or partially-read books should enjoy a larger share of my attention! I love YA, as you know, but I’m conscious of the fact I’ve already got a fair bit of that on my OC list – my current list of 6 is half YA at present, with Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist, Finding Audrey, and Me and Earl and the Dying Girl representing that category of books! I had already compared books to food in recent blogs, saying you don’t want the same thing all the time, you want some variety. Just as much as you fill a plate with various bits and bobs from an eat as much as you like buffet, you need a balanced diet in general. Even if you love a certain meal, you wouldn’t have it every bloody day, would you? So, I need other books on my OC list, not just young adult novels with geeky lads in them, lol!

I still intend to start on Dumplin’ fairly soon, and the idea of reading through that “rainbow tower” of books still appeals to me, and that would start off with Stargirl, so that would be YA. I think I should finish at least Nick & Norah, though, before any more YA makes its way on to the OC list! Some general fiction, rather than YA, could go on my list, or perhaps some non-fiction. Another autobiography, perhaps? I Am Zlatan Ibrahimovic is on my list at present, though, so maybe non-fiction which isn’t autobiographical, or at least less autobiographical. Perhaps some historical fiction, too. Those are usually amongst the “chunkies” of the book world, but there’ll certainly be space on my plate for a chunky novel once An Equal Music has been read. Perhaps I should give Gould’s Book of Fish a go, or even re-try The Luminaries?

Anyway, I’m off to close the wardrobe door and put things back where they were. Maybe the missing books I blogged about earlier this month are hiding out in another part of that unit? We don’t have time for that episode now, but it will probably crop up in a future blog! For the time being, take care and Happy Reading!

Joanne x x x

Non-duplicate books mentioned in this blog entry…

  • An Equal Music – Vikram Seth
  • Me and Earl and the Dying Girl – Jesse Andrews
  • An Abundance of Katherines – John Green
  • Finding Audrey – Sophie Kinsella
  • Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist – Rachel Cohn & David Levithan
  • Dumplin’ – Julie Murphy
  • Stargirl – Jerry Spinelli
  • I Am Zlatan Ibrahimovic – Zlatan Ibrahimovic
  • Gould’s Book of Fish – Richard Flanagan
  • The Luminaries – Eleanor Catton

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Filed under Autobiography/Biography, Books, Charity Shop Bargains, Duplicate Books List, Football, Humour, Literary Issues, Music, My Bookworm History, Olympic Games, Ongoing Concerns, Television, The TBR Pile, Volcanoes, YA Books

One Word Titles

Books and nibbles March 2017

Good evening, fellow Bookworms!

Been to book club this evening, so If I Could Tell You Just One Thing, by Richard Reed, has been discussed, and we’ve gone from one extreme to another in terms of book title, as Moonstone, by Sjón, is our next book, and our next meeting is on 12th April. While I was at Waterstone’s, I also purchased Ink, by Alice Broadway, as I couldn’t resist the strikingly beautiful cover of this YA novel. Thus, this blog has a bit of a theme – one word titles. Well, if it’s a good enough policy for Pet Shop Boys album titles, then it’s good enough for a book blog theme!

Technically speaking, Moonstone bears the subtitle The Boy Who Never Was, which, I think, might actually be the title of the book in other editions, perhaps overseas in certain countries. Don’t get me started on that matter! There is a book I read some years ago for book club, one which I enjoyed, called The Other Hand, by Chris Cleave, but in the USA and New Zealand, this same book is known as Little Bee.Why do publishing houses do this?! It’s just bloody confusing! It’s actually a good job I’d read this book and knew both titles, because I was once in Waterstone’s in the Trafford Centre a year or so ago, and was able to help a fellow customer who said she was looking for Little Bee by letting her know that it’s known as The Other Hand over here! Is it really asking too much for publishers to have the same title for any given book the world over?! Stop confusing bookworms! Different editions having different covers is one thing, but different bloody NAMES?! Find a title you like and stick to it!

And, while we’re at it, this latest book club book is Moonstone, and is set in Iceland, so it’s not to be confused with The Moonstone, which is a much older, and chunkier, novel by Wilkie Collins. If I make that distinction here, it means both books are on List Challenges, on the Joanne’s Bookshelf Blogs – Books Mentioned 2017 list, and therefore people will know I mean two different novels! There shouldn’t be any of that “D’ya think she meant THE Moonstone?” type of confusion. There’s a volcano in this Icelandic one, so that should be of interest to me, plus the fact that I’ve been to Iceland, so I can picture it, as I could when I read the excellent Burial Rites, by Hannah Kent.

I was actually looking for a rather long-titled book in the YA section, but couldn’t find Aristotle and Dante Discover The Secrets of the Universe, by Benjamin Alire Sáenz, and it was while I was meandering amongst the young adult novels that Ink caught my eye – well, it couldn’t really fail to with that beautiful cover! I know you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover if proverbs are anything to go by, but it can’t be helped sometimes! Some covers are just too eye-catching and/or gorgeous to resist!

I’ve also got my eyes on Diary of an Oxygen Thief, by Anonymous, for a future read. Has to be said the rather mad-looking snowman on the cover attracted me, lol, and it seemed amusing and fairly short, so it would be a good potential Handbag Book.

Anyway, back to short titles… there are a fair few books I have in on my notorious TBR list which have one word titles. There’s Fishbowl, by Bradley Somer, which was one of the ones mentioned when I put books to the vote to be my Wembley Book for the EFL Cup Final last month. My sister gave that one a vote because of the title! There’s also Dumplin’, by Julie Murphy, which is hanging around on my book piles wondering when I’m going to get around to reading it! I also have a YA trilogy by Maggie Stiefvater, all three books of which have one word titles – Shiver, Linger and Forever, so if we were having a one word title book binge, that would be a good trilogy to go for! I have three books by Kate Mosse, each with a one word title, although I think Labyrinth, Sepulchre and Citadel are all stand alone novels.

Wonder, by R. J Palacio, and Stargirl, by Jerry Spinelli, are another two YA books on the TBR pile, they were both in the rainbow tower I featured in a recent blog, and there’s Ghostwritten, by David Mitchell, which is on the notorious Half-Read Books list! Only thing is, last time I tried to progress with that one, I wasn’t really in the mood for it. Maybe I will be in the mood to progress with it some time soon, but it wasn’t doing anything for me the last time I picked it up. Even following it via audiobook seemed like a chore, it just wasn’t grabbing me, so it rejoined the Half Read Books list.

I’ve just looked on the Bass Amp Book Pile, but none of those books have one word titles, so that rules those out of our current theme. Just looking around Computer Corner, I see my Paulo Coelho books, and notice Brida, one I’ve yet to read, and one which would fit the bill on the one word title front. It also has an Irish setting, so would be rather apt given that it’s St Patrick’s Day on Friday. Down here, by my side, on a revolving shelf unit, I have Lolita, or “that book by Nabokov” as mentioned in the lyrics of “Don’t Stand So Close To Me” by The Police! I also have Nocturnes, by Kazuo Ishiguro, which is a book of short stories about music and nightfall. Should I want the original vampire novel, Dracula, by Bram Stoker, is close at hand, and for my volcano fix, Krakatoa, by Simon Winchester, is also readily available, and you know I like my non-fiction as much as my fiction!

Anyway, I shall see what at least one of my new books is like, as Moonstone will have to be added to the Ongoing Concerns for now, and I will be giving you an update on the others pretty soon, although none of the other OCs have one word titles, so it’s not really the time and place to do an update in this particular blog entry. Thus, I shall bring this blog to its conclusion and, until the next time, take care and Happy Reading!

Joanne x x x

Books mentioned in this blog entry…

  • If I Could Tell You Just One Thing – Richard Reed
  • Moonstone – Sjón
  • Ink – Alice Broadway
  • The Other Hand – Chris Cleave
  • The Moonstone – Wilkie Collins
  • Burial Rites – Hannah Kent
  • Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe – Benjamin Alire Sáenz
  • Diary of an Oxygen Thief – Anonymous
  • Fishbowl – Bradley Somer
  • Dumplin’ – Julie Murphy
  • Shiver – Maggie Stiefvater
  • Linger – Maggie Stiefvater
  • Forever – Maggie Stiefvater
  • Labyrinth – Kate Mosse
  • Sepulchre – Kate Mosse
  • Citadel – Kate Mosse
  • Wonder – R. J. Palacio
  • Stargirl – Jerry Spinelli
  • Ghostwritten – David Mitchell
  • Brida – Paulo Coelho
  • Lolita – Vladimir Nabokov
  • Nocturnes – Kazuo Ishiguro
  • Dracula – Bram Stoker
  • Krakatoa – Simon Winchester

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Filed under Books, E-Books & Audiobooks, Half-Finished Books, List Challenges, Literary Issues, Music, Rants, The TBR Pile, Volcanoes, YA Books

February Review

Natural Born Bookworm!

I Read Therefore I Am!

Hello, again, fellow Bookworms!

Two months of 2017 done and dusted already! Can you believe it?! February has been a very busy, eventful month with plenty of blogs, so it was little wonder I notched up my 100th book blog during the course of this month, and celebrated by listing all the books I’d mentioned in one huge list on List Challenges! It came to 500 books!

The Goodreads Challenge is well on track, and I have now completed 10 books so far this year, adding another five to the five I’d read by the end of January. Jamrach’s Menagerie, by Carol Birch, finally came off the Half-Read Books list, although there are still plenty more of those which need finishing off. My next finish was pretty short – Chronicle of a Death Foretold, by Gabriel Garcia Marquez, meaning he can now be added to the list of authors of whose works I’ve read more than one!

I Know This Much, the autobiography of Gary Kemp, Spandau Ballet’s guitarist, was next over the finishing line, as I read that in time to return it to my friend Sarah before we went to see the Pet Shop Boys in concert on 19th February. It had been one of two books she lent me, but I’d read the other one last year.

In the spirit of finally getting around to reading books which I’ve had for absolutely ages, and in a spirit of rebellion against this notion that dystopian novels are the way to go right now, I decided what I needed most from my reading matter was humour! There is far too much gloomy shit going on in real life – the last bloody thing I need is the likes of Orwell, thank you very much! So, I went with Tony Hawks and I was so glad I did – Round Ireland With a Fridge is absolutely brilliant! VERY funny and exactly what I needed!

There have been a few rants. As you can tell from the above paragraph, one of them was about my need to put my mental health first and speak out against a lot of bullshit which does the rounds these days, such as “self-help” and “advice” from so-called life coaches. The other main rant was my periodic insistence that the most important thing about books is their content, NOT what the author looks like! The only thing you need to differentiate between is fiction and non-fiction, NOT between male and female authors!

Oh, and I also had a bit of an incident when my books got all excited and toppled over! Two piles of books fell down when Henrikh Mkhitaryan scored United’s opening goal away to Leicester City! Pleased to report, though, that this seems to have been a one-off occurrence, and that my books have since managed to remain calm despite further United goals and our EFL Cup victory against Southampton at Wembley on Sunday! No books fell over while I was down at the cup final, I’m pleased to report! It brings us on to our final finished book for February, that being Premier League Years 1992/93 by Andrew Hyslop, which I started reading on my Kindle on the way home from Wembley, and I finished reading it yesterday evening!

Just been enjoying some yummy pancakes! Yay for Pancake Day – that one day of the year when you can say someone is a complete tosser and mean it as a compliment, lol! My mum makes awesome pancakes, I think my blog readers ought to know this information, just as much as they ought to know that I have now added a sixth book to my read list for this month, and thus an 11th book overall, as I have read The Book With No Pictures, by B. J. Novak. I’d seen it mentioned on Facebook the other day, and I shared it to my book group on FB. My sister saw my post and it turns out that my niece, Charlotte, has that book, and they’d brought it round for me to read when I got back from my placement this evening! Very funny!

So, those are the finished books this month, now onto the ongoing concerns and new additions to the ongoing concerns! The two chunky ones are The Saffron Trail, by Rosanna Ley, and An Equal Music, by Vikram Seth, and I’m just over halfway in both books now. Then comes I Am Zlatan Ibrahimovic, and I am also just over halfway through our Swedish striker’s autobiography.

The recent additions are The Pie At Night, by Stuart Maconie, and Finding Audrey, by Sophie Kinsella, from which the main protagonist’s mum has gone on the Literary Slap List for being a Daily Fail reader! I’d finished Round Ireland With a Fridge before I went to Wembley, so I needed to add a fresh book to the list of ongoing concerns, and put it to the vote here and on Facebook, with the Maconie book enjoying a narrow victory, rather like the one United enjoyed over Southampton at Wembley, really, lol!

Finding Audrey was found at W H Smith’s when I was at Wythenshawe Hospital last week, visiting my dad. He had a heart attack on 16th February, and had a double bypass op on 23rd, from which he is now recovering well. He is still in hospital at present. It’s a Young Adult novel, but I don’t mind a bit of YA, as regular blog readers will know!

Talking of which, my readership has increased significantly during the course of this month and, at the last count, I had 37 people who follow my book blog, so many thanks to all of you who have chosen to risk it for a biscuit, lol! It is much appreciated!

I simply started blogging in 2010 just for fun, for my own amusement, but it seems others enjoy at least some of my waffle! I’m not Nick Hornby, I’m not blogging for a publication, so I take a leaf out of Frank Sinatra’s book and do it my way! I rant, I let off steam, especially if I think some people are putting many others off reading, I waffle on and on, I go off at tangents, and I often bring football and music into it, but there’s at least a book or two in there somewhere! Often quite a lot of books are mentioned, but there’s usually at least two, even during that time in 2011 when there was rioting and looting on the news and I quoted the manager of a branch of Waterstone’s down in London who said they were staying open and added “If they steal any books, they might actually learn something”!

Well, this is the last day of February, and it’s been a bit mad! Had snow this morning when I was getting ready to head to Eccles, and I have found out, this evening, that Mount Etna is erupting again – I’ve had an interest in volcanoes since I was about 7 or 8, and visited Mount Etna in 2001 when Mum and I were on holiday. We were in Malta on our jollies, but we had a day trip to Sicily and stood on Etna’s slopes. A fortnight later, she burst into lava-spewing life, producing one of the biggest eruptions she’d had in quite some time!

You can blame my dad for my interest in volcanoes, lol! It’s his fault, well to be fair, I think the Open University should take its fair share of responsibility, as it was one of their programmes Dad was watching late one night when I was a kid, and he let me come down to watch because he thought it’d interest me. I’ve read a few books about volcanoes, and have an absolutely MASSIVE book about them – mostly photographic but it does have some writing. This book is so damn big that it is under our coffee table in the living room as it’s the only bloody place it would fit! It’s simply called Volcanoes, and is by Philippe Bourseiller and Jacques Durieux.

Anyway, enough about volcanoes, it’s time I got this blog finished off and published! Until the next blog, take care and Happy Reading!

Joanne x x x

Books mentioned in this blog entry…

  • Jamrach’s Menagerie – Carol Birch
  • Chronicle of a Death Foretold – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
  • I Know This Much: From Soho To Spandau – Gary Kemp
  • Round Ireland With a Fridge – Tony Hawks
  • Premier League Years 1992/93 – Andrew Hyslop
  • The Book With No Pictures – B. J. Novak
  • The Saffron Trail – Rosanna Ley
  • An Equal Music – Vikram Seth
  • I Am Zlatan Ibrahimovic – Zlatan Ibrahimovic
  • The Pie At Night – Stuart Maconie
  • Finding Audrey – Sophie Kinsella
  • Volcanoes – Philippe Bourseiller and Jacques Durieux

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Filed under Arsehole Politicians, Autobiography/Biography, Books, British Weather, Childrens' Books, Football, Goodreads, Half-Finished Books, Handbag Books, Humour, Junior Bookworms, List Challenges, Literary Issues, Literary Slap List, Month in Review, Music, Rants, Television, Travel, Volcanoes, YA Books

Actual Facts – None of your Alternative nonsense here!

george-michael-and-pirsig-book

Good evening, fellow Bookworms!

Welcome to another blog entry, and as usual, there’ll probably be plenty of waffle, but you know that already if you are a regular reader of this nonsense, lol! What you do know is that you will get actual facts from me! You’ll get a shedload of opinion too, that goes without saying, but you will get facts. No bullshit, or “alternative facts” as Mr Fart calls them! The less said about that arsehole, the better, other than to say that this blog is the anti-Fart! We’re old-fashioned here, we still do truth, we still do facts, we don’t do bollocks or bullshit – if I did, I’d be an MP, not a blogger!

Right, let’s not waste any more time or typing on knobheads. Let’s get on to the subject at hand… BOOKS! I finished off In Bloom, by Matthew Crow, the other night, so I now have two finished books on my Goodreads Challenge for 2017. Just another 28 to go, then, lol! Over half-way with The Ashes of London, by Andrew Taylor, and also with the above biography of George Michael, by Rob Jovanovic, so that particular book should be read fairly soon, I would think. Particularly as it’s fairly slim and a good Handbag Book! I was in Waterstone’s the other day, as I’d been in town, and I saw it and bought it. I also bought Zen And The Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, by Robert M. Pirsig.

Not sure entirely what caused that, bit of a whim, I think, but anyway, it’s one of those much talked-about books. Some have listed it on their “life changing books” lists. As I’ve probably said in previous blog entries, I am not sure any book has been life-changing for me, and I’ve been a bookworm since before I started school. That’s a bloody long time! I started in the reception class at primary school in September 1977, so it will be 40 years ago this autumn! And, how do you define life-changing anyway? Perhaps, in my case, it was whichever book turned me into a bookworm even at pre-school age. I have a long memory, but can’t remember exactly which book did it for me. I do know, however, that I was very partial to The Very Hungry Caterpillar, by Eric Carle, when I was a little girl, so it may well have been that classic! It was certainly a fun book to read, with all the holes in the food to give the appearance of having been munched through by the caterpillar in question, so it helped me to associate books with fun.

I may hesitate to describe any book as life changing, but there have been some which have helped me out of a slump when I’ve had reader’s block, and some which have reminded me of certain holidays (vacations, if you’re one of my US readers). I’d had a bad bout of Reader’s Block which had caused me to read very little from 2012 to 2015, only the very occasional book giving me enjoyment, such as Burial Rites, by Hannah Kent, and Where’d You Go, Bernadette?, by Maria Semple, and my 40th birthday holiday in Mexico resulted in my discovery of the brilliant Attention All Shipping, by Charlie Connelly, a journey around the Shipping Forecast which I heartily recommend if you want a good laugh, especially the bit about Faroese puffins, but towards the end of 2015, a couple of books, one non-fiction, and one fiction, helped me back on the book wagon. Those books were Why The Dutch Are Different, by Ben Coates, and The Art of Racing In The Rain, by Garth Stein.

As I said in a recent blog, The Saffron Trail, by Rosanna Ley, is taking me back to Marrakech as I read, making me think of the souks and Jemaa El-Fna Square, and more tagines than you can shake a stick at, lol, but I did buy that book over here before I jetted off to Morocco, and am reading most of it at home, even if I did read some of it at the Riu Tikida Gardens in Marrakech. With Attention All Shipping, it was a different matter, the book had bugger all to do with Mexico, but I actually found it on one of the bookshelves at the El Dorado Seaside Suites and read most of it on a beach bed. It’s just that I hadn’t finished it by the time we jetted off home, so I took it home with me! It reminds me of Mexico because I found the book over there on my jollies, whereas one of my current reads reminds me of a holiday because it’s at least partially set in that particular destination.

The book about the Dutch, and the novel, narrated by the dog, Enzo, helped me out of a reading slump, and I think The Ashes of London is helping me out of a fiction slump which was caused by reading A Little Life last year! Yeah, I’ve read books since I finished Hanya Yanagihara’s epic novel, but the few I read for the remainder of 2016 were non-fiction! Similarly, I’ve been reading a fair bit of non-fiction so far this year, other than The Ashes of London and In Bloom! Currently on the go, I have Why We Love Music, by John Powell, I Am Zlatan Ibrahimovic, by Zlatan Ibrahimovic, rather obviously, lol, and George Michael: The Biography, by Rob Jovanovic.

This should come as no surprise whatsoever – you know I love non-fiction as much as I love fiction, always have enjoyed factual books as much as stories since I was little, and we’re talking about books concerning two of my other favourite subject matters other than books themselves… music and football! Regular blog readers will know that other favourite subject matters include language, travel, food, various aspects and periods of history, and for some mad reason, volcanoes!

The volcanoes are my dad’s fault, lol! If you go back to really old blogs, particularly where I mention All In The Best Possible Taste, by Tom Bromley, a book I read a few years ago now, I go back to my own square-eyed childhood, which was the same era as Tom’s – I worked out he was only a few months older than me – and I blogged about the programmes that were on telly in our house. Programmes I watched, and programmes that Mum and Dad watched. In at least one blog entry around that time, I certainly mentioned that my dad watched a lot of Open University programmes, usually at weekends or late at night on BBC2. I must have been around 7 or 8, I think, in the juniors at primary school, and a right night owl, as I’ve always been. Dad let me come down to watch a programme with him because he thought it would interest me. It was an erupting volcano, and it was fascinating! Like watching a natural firework display! So, the fact that I’ve had a thing for volcanoes since I was about eight is my dad’s fault! Still pretty glad we don’t have any in the UK, though!

frankie-presto-book

I mentioned, earlier, The Art of Racing in the Rain, by Garth Stein, a book which had helped me out of a bout of Reader’s Block towards the end of 2015. That book is narrated by the dog, and I must have a thing for unusual narration in fiction, as one of my favourite books is The Book Thief, by Markus Zusak, and that is narrated by Death. Thanks to the Bookshop Cafe group on Facebook, I have discovered another interesting novel, with unusual narration, that being The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto, by Mitch Albom. Music is the narrator of this novel, so there’s a theme of music, and unusual narration. Definitely sounded like my cup of tea! (Even if that’s a coffee in the photo, along with the doughnuts, lol!)

Anyway, talking of liquid refreshment, I need a brew, and that’s a fact, so I am off to put the kettle on, and further book talk will be saved for the next blog, when I hope I might even have got at least one of my current reads finished off, possibly the George Michael biography, and I will probably be waffling on just as much about music or football as about books, but you must be used to that by now, surely?!

Until next time, take care and Happy Reading!

Joanne x x x

Books mentioned in this blog entry:

  • In Bloom – Matthew Crow
  • The Ashes of London – Andrew Taylor
  • George Michael: The Biography – Rob Jovanovic
  • Zen And The Art of Motorcycle Maintenance – Robert M. Pirsig
  • The Very Hungry Caterpillar – Eric Carle
  • Burial Rites – Hannah Kent
  • Where’d You Go, Bernadette? – Maria Semple
  • Attention All Shipping – Charlie Connelly
  • Why The Dutch Are Different – Ben Coates
  • The Art of Racing In The Rain – Garth Stein
  • The Saffron Trail – Rosanna Ley
  • A Little Life – Hanya Yanagihara
  • Why We Love Music – John Powell
  • I Am Zlatan Ibrahimovic – Zlatan Ibrahimovic
  • All In The Best Possible Taste – Tom Bromley
  • The Book Thief – Markus Zusak
  • The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto – Mitch Albom

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Filed under Arsehole Politicians, Autobiography/Biography, Books, My Bookworm History, Non-Fiction, Television, Travel, Volcanoes

The Bookworm’s Glossary

Natural Born Bookworm!

I Read Therefore I Am!

Good evening, fellow Bookworms!

This is a bit of a guide to this blog, as I sense I’ve had a few new followers of late, since I started blogging quite frequently this month. Basically, I just waffle on about books, often quite randomly, sometimes getting off topic. The books are usually a wide mix of reading matter, fiction and non-fiction alike, and it doesn’t mean I’ve read them. Some I will have read, some will have been partially-read, and others will not have been read.

Autobiographies: Books written by the authors about themselves. I particularly enjoy autobiographies by musicians and footballers, and recently read I Think Therefore I Play, by Andrea Pirlo.

Books About Books: Whether fact or fiction, I like reading books on the subject of other books, and fiction set in book shops or libraries!

Book Chest: This is in our garage, and contains a large quantity of my books, stacked three deep in places…

Book Club: A bunch of bookworms getting together on a regular basis for reading purposes. A book is decided on, and the date of the meeting. The aim is to have read the book, or as much of it as possible, and discuss it at the meeting, then choose the next book. I have been in a book club since 2008. Mine is at Waterstone’s on Deansgate, but many book groups are round at peoples’ houses.

Book Jar: A great idea in theory, but then you give some thought to using it and picking a random piece of paper from it, only to realise you don’t know where some of those books actually are, especially as you had a bit of a book reshuffle not long ago… You start wondering where the hell Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand is actually lurking at the moment…

Bookshelves: Mythical things! Or, at least, almost-mythical items, of which the average bookworm does not have a sufficient quantity for all their reading matter!

Computer Corner: Where I am right now. The corner of my room where my laptop and the printer/copier/scanner reside! There are piles of books surrounding me here, and more piles under this corner! Sometimes I get under the corner with the flashlight on my mobile phone and see what’s under there! I had a shufty the other day. Amongst other reading matter down there, I found four books by Edward Rutherfurd: The Forest, Dublin, New York, and Russka. You know the other day, when I was going on about historical fiction being chunky? Those certainly prove that point! I read The Forest a few years ago now, it was a book club choice, and one which I enjoyed, but I have not yet read the other three Rutherfurd books.

I did bring a book up from under Computer Corner the other night, but it was not one of the Rutherfurd books. I surfaced holding a copy of A Case of Exploding Mangoes, by Mohammed Hanif.

Crime: This genre covers a wide range, from the likes of Agatha Christie to the Scandinavian crime writers such as Jo Nesbo and Henning Mankell. Not really my genre, although I am about halfway through The Snowman, by Jo Nesbo. There is also True Crime, but that should really come under non-fiction.

Donaldson, Julia: Author of a huge range of children’s books, including Charlie Cook’s Favourite Book, and The Smartest Giant In Town. She is my niece’s favourite author.

Erotica: Fiction of a sexual nature, for readers aged 18 or over…

Fantasy: Fiction usually set in different worlds to our own, with lots of non-human creatures involved. Sir Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series is an example of fantasy fiction, a very humorous example I might add!

Fiction: Stories. Non-factual stuff. Within fiction, though, you have different genres, e.g. fantasy, crime, science fiction, historical fiction, etc…

Football: Something I love watching, and thus reading about. (Soccer, to my US readers.)

Goodreads: Deadly website for bookworms, as it just tempts us into even more books than were already on our TBR piles!

Handbag Books: Books slim enough to fit in a decent-sized handbag (or purse, as my readers in the US would say). Preferably with a view to fitting more than one book in said bag at the same time and still having room for your other essentials, such as your keys and wallet.

Historical Fiction: A genre which generally results in chunky books! Definitions of what actually constitutes historical fiction vary, but here is the Wikipedia entry for the genre…

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historical_fiction

If the book’s setting is a bloody long time ago, and that is the basis of the novel, then there is a decent bet it can be classed as historical fiction. The Goodreads definition is as follows… (see link provided)

https://www.goodreads.com/genres/historical-fiction

It is said that if the setting of the book is at least 25 years before the year in which the author is writing it, that novel may constitute historical fiction. I’m not so sure on that 25 year rule, but I’d think that if a significant period of time has elapsed since the setting of that book, it is historical. For me, anything set in the 1970s or 1980s would be historical fiction, thus Black Swan Green, by David Mitchell, set in 1982 at the time of the Falklands Conflict, is just as much a work of historical fiction as Wolf Hall, by Hilary Mantel.

If that’s the rule, and it’s 25 years, then anything set in 1991 would now be historical fiction! So, suppose you wrote a book set in that year against the backdrop of United winning the old European Cup-Winners’ Cup in Rotterdam, and Bryan Adams being number one for 16 weeks that summer, and it would, technically speaking, qualify as historical fiction!

Horror: Fiction designed to scare the living shit out of you! I am a wuss, so I really tend to avoid this sort of stuff!

In Off My Chest!: My football blog, also hosted by Word Press. However, I have been known to mention football on this blog fairly frequently, and have occasionally mentioned books in my football blog. If I am reading the biography or autobiography of a player or manager, it’s pretty obvious that there is going to be some football and book overlap! For those who don’t already know, I am a die-hard Manchester United supporter and a season-ticket holder in the Stretford End. I go to all home games.

Junior Bookworm: My niece, Charlotte. It can also be applied to any young readers, but I am usually referring to my niece. She is currently five going on six and loves reading, enjoying both fiction and non-fiction alike.

List Challenges: Another deadly and very tempting website, as the book challenges just act as recommendations for even more books! Mind you, it’s quite useful as a record of all the damn books I mention on here, lol!

Music: One of my favourite subject matters in works of fiction and non-fiction alike.

Non-fiction: Factual stuff, including reference material. I read a lot of factual stuff as well as fiction, and have done from a young age. It would appear my niece is doing likewise!

Olympic Games, The: Another of my favourite subject matters. Usually non-fiction.

Potterheads: Fans of the Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling. I am a Potterhead, thanks to one of my colleagues when I worked at Manchester DBC.

Science Fiction: Usually set in some imagined future, often with a space-aged theme, but could also be an alternative reality. Science fiction is sometimes lumped together with fantasy, as there can be elements of fantasy in some SF writing.

Sheet Music: Music in its written form. If that music is compiled into a book, I figure that it should be classed as a book on here, for example Best of Bowie, which I bought recently, as that is a book of sheet music for the songs on the double album of the same name. I have also mentioned an orchestral score before now. I have a lot of sheet music, for a variety of instruments, and combinations of instruments!

TBR Pile (or TBR List): To Be Read. A never-ending list of books you’d like to get around to reading when you’ve finished your current book or books. For the average bookworm, this is a very long list, so long we usually don’t know how long it is exactly and it would actually scare us to find out!

Travel Writing: Something I enjoy, both factual and fictional. I particularly recommend Bill Bryson as a travel writer.

Volcanoes: Another of my favourite subject matters, I have had an interest in volcanoes since I was about 7 or 8 and my dad let me come downstairs late one night to watch some television programme with him which featured an erupting volcano. I think it was an Open University programme on BBC2, he watched a lot of those, but anyway, it was enough to fascinate me and make me want to find out more about volcanoes.

Waterstone’s: UK book store chain. It is nigh on impossible for me to enter a branch without purchasing at least one book. In fact, it’s hard for me to buy just one – there are usually multiple purchases each time! The main one, locally, is on Deansgate in Manchester, and it is huge, and I belong to the book club there, but there is also a branch in the Arndale Centre in town, and at the Trafford Centre.

Young Adult: Books, mostly fiction, aimed at teenage readers. However, it does not just include books aimed particularly at the teenage market, but also general fiction which publishers think might also be enjoyed by 13-18 year olds, particularly if at least one of the main characters is a child or teenager. Mind you, ANY adult can also enjoy YA, and I enjoy a fair bit of it! It has a lot to recommend it!

Zeds: Something I say I need when sleep comes upon me! That is not quite true right now, but it does bring this blog entry to an end, so, until next time, Happy Reading!

Books mentioned in this blog entry:

  • I Think Therefore I Play – Andrea Pirlo
  • Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand – Helen Simonson
  • The Forest – Edward Rutherfurd
  • Dublin – Edward Rutherfurd
  • New York – Edward Rutherfurd
  • Russka – Edward Rutherfurd
  • A Case of Exploding Mangoes – Mohammed Hanif
  • The Snowman – Jo Nesbo
  • Charlie Cook’s Favourite Book – Julia Donaldson
  • The Smartest Giant In Town – Julia Donaldson
  • The Discworld series – Sir Terry Pratchett
  • Black Swan Green – David Mitchell
  • Wolf Hall – Hilary Mantel
  • The Harry Potter series – J. K. Rowling
  • Best of Bowie – David Bowie (sheet music)

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Filed under Adult Fiction, Autobiography/Biography, Books, Books About Books, Childrens' Books, Football, Goodreads, Handbag Books, Historical Fiction, Junior Bookworms, List Challenges, Music, Non-Fiction, Sports, The TBR Pile, Travel, Volcanoes, YA Books