Category Archives: Food & Drink

Mission Accomplished!

Gallagher Girls Series

Good evening, fellow Bookworms!

Blogs are like buses, sometimes… You wait absolutely ages for one, and a couple come along at once! Not sure this is going to be the usual double-decker though, just one of those little buses, but we shall see…

It’s just that I have some quite big news on the book front for all of you who have read my blogs and know that I’ve been acquiring the Gallagher Girls series of YA novels about girls at a spy school over the past year or so, and have been doing so by getting them from local charity shops. In my previous blog the other night, I had managed to get my mitts on Book 4 from the Age UK shop on Monton Road, and just had Book 5 to get…

Well, I got it this afternoon from The A Word, a charity shop in Eccles in aid of an autism charity. There were a few books from the series, actually, but Out of Sight, Out of Time, by Ally Carter, was one of the Gallagher Girls books available in that shop, and only a quid, so my series is now complete and I have been able to do it by acquiring them from local charity shops, mostly in Monton and Eccles.

All part of a pretty good day, really. Started by getting certain things sorted for the end of the year – I have said I will be busy around new year, and so the List Challenges lists associated with my reading for the year, and the books I’ve mentioned on here during the course of 2019, may well be published before my unavailability. If I remember, lol, I will let you all know in January what that was all about!

Got my bus and tram pass, so that got sorted for another few weeks. Also had a little look at the Christmas markets that are based in Piccadilly Gardens. Manchester looking very festive! Bought some stroopwafels from one stall and some cheese from another – it’s actually charcoal cheese. Yes, it’s black, but do not let that put you off! It tastes like Mini Cheddars! UK readers will know what I mean! They’re made by Jacobs and they’re a savoury snack, diddy cracker-type things that are mildly cheesy and very pleasant! That’s for my Transatlantic friends – my best description of what Mini Cheddars are. If  you have any shops that import British food, you might be able to find them. Anyway, this particular cheese tastes like those do.

And then I got a tram back to Eccles and had a mooch round there, and found the Gallagher Girls book in that charity shop I was telling you about.

After returning home for a short while, it was time to head off to Tim Horton’s for tea – Mum and I do this at least once a month, although we hope to fit another visit in before the end of the year. It has been the Manchester Derby today, albeit across town at our neighbours’ ground, not at OT, but it clearly didn’t matter to our lads that they were the away side as we won 2-1! Yay! Jingle bells, Jingle bells, jingle all the way! Oh what fun it is to see United win away! City 1 United 2. Marcus Rashford from the penalty spot on 23 minutes and then Anthony Martial on 29 minutes. City got a goal back with 5 minutes to go, but we held on for the win.

From the last blog, in which I was talking about getting around to it, or even a round tuit, lol, I can now start on the Gallagher Girls series knowing that I’ve got all the books. However, I might draw up a shortlist, or longlist, of some books I feel I’ve had for ages, which could be priorities for the Getting A Round Tuit List…

English Passengers, by Matthew Kneale, would probably have to be quite high up on that list, as I have said on a few occasions that I have had that book for a while and not got round to it yet. Same goes for Bel Canto, by Ann Patchett, and Mister Pip, by Lloyd Jones. Another one I could add is Nocturnes, by Kazuo Ishiguro, which is a book of five short stories about music and nightfall. He’s Japanese, but has lived in the UK since he was 5. He is now 65, so that’s been quite a while now, lol!

I could even try to give The Luminaries, by Eleanor Catton, another go. I did try it some years ago, but didn’t get very far. However, I was having a bit of a book slump at the time, so I don’t know if it was that the book wasn’t right for me, or whether it was just that it was a bad time for me to try to read it.

Resuming C. J. Sansom‘s Shardlake series could be another thing for the Around Tuit list… I did read the first book, Dissolution, a year or so ago, but really need to get back to the series and start on Dark Fire. Especially as there are 7 books in that series and I have quite a way to go, lol! For the record, the others are Sovereign, Revelation, Heartstone, Lamentation, and Tombland. Quite a lot of reading material there, especially as it’s historical fiction and quite chunky! Tombland definitely looks like a chunky monkey of a book!

While we’re on chunky monkeys and historical fiction… Ken Follett! The Pillars of the Earth definitely needs to go on the A Round Tuit list!

Right, gonna break off and resume in a bit. Match of the Day is coming on soon, and the Manchester Derby is the first match on it, so once I’ve seen our 2-1 away victory over City, I shall resume this blog!

* goes off to the loo, then settles down in front of the telly for the footy… *

Right, back again! Telly is still on, but the derby has been on and I have watched our victory, so I am back at my laptop again! Before I went off to watch highlights of City 1 United 2, I was mentioning my A Round Tuit list of books I’ve had for some time and probably should get around to trying. One of those could be Norwegian Wood, by Haurki Murakami. I have definitely had that one knocking around here for donkey’s years.

Might be worth exploring under the laptop, actually, as there are several piles of books under Computer Corner! I think I’ve got Angela’s Ashes, by Frank McCourt under there, and I have definitely had that one a long time without reading it yet, so I could add that to the list. Not arsed if it’s fiction or non-fiction, I’m investigating stuff that I’ve had around for quite a while, whatever form of published writing it takes… Fiction, non-fiction, poetry, short stories, etc… If I see a book that I recognise as having been hanging around here for a substantial length of time, then it can go on the list!

Think of it as a branch of the TBR Pile, but perhaps a priority list for some of those which have waited patiently enough to be read, ha ha! Shantaram, by Gregory David Roberts, definitely needs to be added to the list. Here I am finding more books for the A Round Tuit list, and the “small bus” blog starts to look a lot bigger! Got a few chunky monkey historical fiction novels by Edward Rutherfurd under Computer Corner, including New York and Dublin. Those have been around for some time! The Forest is there, too, but I read that some years ago for the former Waterstone’s book club. I also have Paris, and pretty sure I have Russka, too.

I think that’s probably about it for now, or I might start waffling on about more historical fiction novels. I can save those for the next blog, lol! Trust me, there are more, and most of them are pretty damn chunky! I’ve got 153 books on the list of things I’ve mentioned on here this year. Yeah, that’s not a lot compared to past years, but given that I only started reading and blogging again in April after a book slump and the early months of my bereavement, it’s not too shabby. There will be 4 pages of books as things stand. Each page on List Challenges has 40 books. Might get it to a 5th page, providing I break the 160 book barrier! Not unfeasible given what I’m like when I get going and find books to mention on here!

If I can’t get around to blogging before Christmas, I wish you all the very best for the season, and I hope to be in touch between Christmas and New Year to get a few more books mentioned and review stuff from the year from the books I have managed to read. It’s been the year of the Object Lessons, really! Still got plenty more of those lined up so I hope to get through some of them in 2020.

Until the next blog, have a very Merry Christmas and I hope you get plenty of books, or at least gift cards for book shops!

Happy Reading!

Joanne x x x

Books mentioned in this blog entry…

  • Out of Sight, Out of Time – Ally Carter
  • English Passengers – Matthew Kneale
  • Bel Canto – Ann Patchett
  • Mister Pip – Lloyd Jones
  • Nocturnes – Kazuo Ishiguro
  • The Luminaries – Eleanor Catton
  • Dissolution – C. J. Sansom
  • Dark Fire – C. J. Sansom
  • Sovereign – C. J. Sansom
  • Revelation – C. J. Sansom
  • Heartstone – C. J. Sansom
  • Lamentation – C. J. Sansom
  • Tombland – C. J. Sansom
  • The Pillars of the Earth – Ken Follett
  • Norwegian Wood – Haruki Murakami
  • Angela’s Ashes – Frank McCourt
  • Shantaram – Gregory David Roberts
  • New York – Edward Rutherfurd
  • Dublin – Edward Rutherfurd
  • The Forest – Edward Rutherfurd
  • Paris – Edward Rutherfurd
  • Russka – Edward Rutherfurd

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Filed under A Round Tuit!, Books, Charity Shop Bargains, Chunky Monkeys, Computer Corner, Food & Drink, Football, Historical Fiction, List Challenges, Manc Stuff!, Music, Non-Fiction, Poetry, The TBR Pile, YA Books

The Unwelcome Return of Brock’s Posterior.

do i need more books pie chart

Good evening, fellow Bookworms!

Or rather, cough, cough, cough, cough, cough… ad infinitum… Seriously, it is doing my head in! This current lurgy has been lurking since around 14th-15th August or so, when I had what I can only describe as dizziness before getting some zeds. I still felt a bit dodgy at work on the Thursday, so I rang up our medical centre while I was in the office and I got an appointment for that, which was in Eccles on the Saturday morning before I returned to the Museum of Science and Industry to actually go to the Power Up event, and the doc looked in my ears and said what I’d had was likely to have been vertigo as I had described feeling as though I was turning even when I was laying still. He gave me a prescription to sort that out. However, he didn’t find any infection, but I was coming down with a sore throat that day. Still had a nice time at MOSI, although would have been nicer if the Badger’s Arse wasn’t upon me!

Full marks, though, to my local medical centre who found me the appointment at the Gateway on the Saturday. I didn’t even know they could do that before they found that appointment for me, but I was pretty impressed! It was still fairly local and it was convenient.

So glad that this is a Bank Holiday weekend, and that we have that extra day off tomorrow! I was off on Monday just gone, too full of a cold to be in work, and then for the rest of the week, I’ve definitely been under the weather. Sometimes it’s been because I’ve not been able to get enough sleep at night due to the damn coughing. My catarrh has been worse than ever, too! Seriously, my ears and nose hate me! I can see why the Spanish word for a cold is el catarro. I feel like I need a lifetime’s supply of catarrh pastilles from Boots! So, a bit of reading has been done, but not much. I’ve not had too much problem with watery eyes, as such, but I’ve needed to catch up on lost zeds at times due to the coughing. However, a little progress has been made on the book front.

I’ve got two non-fiction books on the go. Still reading Eye Chart, from the Object Lessons series, and I have resumed Made In Scotland, by Sir Billy Connolly, as the TV programmes were on last weekend, and that reminded me that I had the book and should get on with it.

Still dithering over the fiction. Perhaps I should get at least one of my non-fiction books off my Ongoing Concerns list first before I start a fiction book? I know that has never stopped me before, but I feel the need to build back up since my recent book slump last year and my bereavement in January.

In recent blogs, I’ve mentioned that I’ve now got to the stage where I need reading glasses and distance glasses. I can tell you one advantage right now when it comes to my reading glasses… I don’t need a magnifying glass any more to read the digits at the bottom of my Tim Horton’s receipt! I always do the online survey for Timmie’s so I can get a free baked good, but the code at the bottom is quite small, and I’ve had to get a magnifier out in the past. No need for that now! The Canadian coffee and donut chain opened up branches in the UK starting in late 2017, and opened one in Salford just before Christmas that year, so Mum and I have been making it a regular thing. We usually go at least once a month. We first had Timmie’s ten years ago when we went to Canada, and had been wanting branches over here ever since! I have probably mentioned this in previous blogs, but thought I’d bring it up again as I can now read the codes on my receipts with my new specs!

Anyway, let’s get on with the damn books… that’s what we’re really here for, isn’t it?! Couple of items of reading matter were acquired last Saturday when I was in town. Well, I had a sore throat, it was the start of the Badger’s Arse, I needed some retail therapy, didn’t I?! I acquired Thanks a Lot, Mr Kibblewhite, by Roger Daltrey, and Wish You Were Here, by Mike Gayle, from W H Smith’s. Actually, that latter one could be listed in the Books With the Same Name as Song Titles list, as Wish You Were Here is an old song by Pink Floyd. It was also the name of a TV travel show that was on telly when I was a kid, presented by Judith Chalmers!

Having just looked it up, it ran from January 1974 when it was first shown on British television, back when I was still a baby, and the last programme was broadcast in June 2003, by which time I was 30, so it lasted around 29 and a half years! I guess the fact that people can now book their jollies on the internet and look at hotels and holiday resorts on their computer meant that there wasn’t the need to have TV shows about holidays (vacations) anymore.

I may have mentioned a series by Ally Carter in previous blogs, the Gallagher Girls series about a spy school. Managed to get another of the books in that series, the third one, from a charity shop in Swinton after work the other day, so I have got the first three now, and also the sixth one. I already had I’d Tell You I Love You, But Then I’d Have to Kill You, which I have actually started some time ago, need to resume that one, and the second book is Cross My Heart & Hope to Spy. I got hold of Don’t Judge a Girl By Her Cover the other day, so I’m just missing books 4 and 5, Only the Good Spy Young, and Out of Sight, Out of Time. The sixth book is United We Spy, but I have that one. My aim has been to get them from charity shops. I could easily get them from a regular book shop, but not only is it more fun to look out for them when they’re not in actual book shops, it’s a lot cheaper when I do find them, and helps whatever good cause that shop raises money for.

Couple of other recent charity shop finds, these two both hardbacks, were Life, by Keith Richards, and Past-It Notes, by Maureen Lipman. Somewhere, I have another of her books, You Got an Ology? which is from when she starred as Beattie in a series of brilliant commercials for British Telecom. The book contains the scripts from the adverts, and also some background stuff on the making of the ads! I really hope I can find it, as it’s a brilliant book and very funny, especially for those of us who remember those adverts!

There has been an extension to the time for reading A Taste of Honey. Due to the fact it’s the school holidays at the moment over here, it’s the time when a lot of staff are off if they have kids, and they’re going away, so the staff book club at work has cancelled the August meeting and put back the discussion on Shelagh Delaney‘s play until late September. I still need to see if I can find it on YouTube, an entire performance. I think it’s best with a play, as I’ve said before, if you can see it performed. That’s the whole point. What you are reading is a script. It needs to be acted out.

* goes to get a catarrh pastille *

Right, sorry about that, Bookworms. Back again now. Got the fan on as well, as the damn heatwave has returned. The stupid catarrh is still here. Wish that would bugger off.

As you will notice from this blog, a few of my recent purchases have been autobiographies. Perhaps I could have a phase of getting those read. I do have a lot lying around. Various ones. Mostly either sports people or musicians! From where I am sitting, I can see Between the Lines, by Michael Carrick. Still need to get that read. Might as well do the autobiographies while I’m still very much in non-fiction mode, as well as the Object Lessons books, and any other factual reading matter. Could also resume Chapter and Verse, by Bernard Sumner. I wouldn’t rule out biographies, either, and I have This Is a Call, by Paul Brannigan, which is a biography of Dave Grohl.

this is illogical captain

As I’m still very much in non-fiction mode, another book I bought recently, which I may start soon, is The Art of Logic, by Eugenia Cheng. It would be illogical not to! Why am I thinking about Mr Spock from Star Trek?! I am a fairly logical person, particularly to the extent that I like logic puzzles and sudoku, but the problem with being logical is that too many other people are definitely NOT logical, lol!

Anyway, the list on List Challenges is now at 124 books. This means we have gone on to a 4th page when the book list gets published. I think you are probably like me, and if you go on List Challenges for the book lists, you like nice long ones that are several pages long so you can go through hundreds or even a thousand or so books, and see which ones you’ve read, so this year’s list will probably be a bit disappointing, as it will be on the small side, but it is getting a bit bigger, lol! I tend not to bother at all with the really small lists. The minimum number of items is 10 and I rarely bother with those. The more books there are, and the more random and varied the selection, the more chance there is that I might have read some of them.

If there’s only ten books, that reader might have picked ten that I’ve never read! Also, if they only read certain genres, they might not be my cup of tea. I might have read some of them if it’s fantasy or science fiction, but I’m unlikely to have read any, or many, if it’s crime or romance. If it’s pretty random, and it’s a mix of fact and fiction, and if there are any particularly funny books in the list, there’s a better chance that I’ve read a few! Travel writing is a decent bet as a genre, I will probably have read a few of those, especially if any are by Bill Bryson as I’ve read a few of his books. Plus, that’s non-fiction anyway!

Right, well, time I got this blog posted, really, so we’ll leave it there for now. We can resume again another time, when there’s more books to mention, and hopefully the Badger’s Arse from Hell has buggered off and stopped troubling me! Until next time, take care and Happy Reading!

Joanne x x x

Books mentioned in this blog entry…

  • Eye Chart – William Germano
  • Made In Scotland – Sir Billy Connolly
  • Thanks a Lot Mr Kibblewhite – Roger Daltrey
  • Wish You Were Here – Mike Gayle
  • I’d Tell You I Love You, But Then I’d Have To Kill You – Ally Carter
  • Cross My Heart & Hope To Spy – Ally Carter
  • Don’t Judge a Girl By Her Cover – Ally Carter
  • Only the Good Spy Young – Ally Carter
  • Out of Sight, Out of Time – Ally Carter
  • United We Spy – Ally Carter
  • Life – Keith Richards
  • Past-It Notes – Maureen Lipman
  • You Got an Ology? – Maureen Lipman
  • A Taste of Honey – Shelagh Delaney
  • Between the Lines – Michael Carrick
  • Chapter and Verse – Bernard Sumner
  • This Is a Call – Paul Brannigan
  • The Art of Logic – Eugenia Cheng

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Filed under Autobiography/Biography, Books, Charity Shop Bargains, Duplicate Books List, Food & Drink, Football, Half-Finished Books, Humour, Manc Stuff!, Music, Non-Fiction, Object Lessons, Plays, Sports, Television, Travel, YA Books

New Specs and the New Season

Me with new specs August 2019

Good evening, fellow Bookworms!

Last time I blogged was the day of the Optical Emergency, as you may recall, when I had had to book the day off work because an arm had come off my glasses in the wee small hours, and I’d had to go to the optician’s to have an eye test and get new specs ordered. Well, I collected my specs after work on Friday just gone, and those are my reading glasses in the photo above. I also have distance glasses. As I said in the last blog, I have reached Middle Age now, lol! That’s last season’s shirt, not got a new one yet, but I’ll get on to the footy later.

Anyway, I finished Sock, from the Object Lessons series, the day before I picked up my new glasses, so I was actually able to move on to Eye Chart in time to celebrate the acquisition of my new visual assistance devices! The actual standard, traditional eye chart, which starts with one big letter at the top, usually an E, was invented by a Dutch optician called Herman Snellen. Another feature of the eye test, the card which you are asked to hold at your normal reading distance, was invented by an Austrian guy called Eduard Jaeger, so you now know two of the people responsible for aspects of getting your eyes looked at!

Wonder who invented the contraptions they put all those different lenses in? You know, that bit when they ask if it looks clearer with 1 or with 2, and they pretty much look as blurred or as clear as each other and you can’t tell the bloody difference, lol! I’ve been wearing specs from a pretty young age, before I started primary school, although I don’t think it was until I started school that I wore them properly. Often, before that, I would wear them on top of my head like my Grandad D-J, lol! Thing is, when you’re little, the font size in children’s books is pretty large, so I could read it without my glasses. I can see without my specs, but as I am long-sighted, things look further away than they really are when I’m not wearing them. Also, I have a lazy left eye that doesn’t look the right way.

There is actually a suburb of Manchester called Longsight. Bearing in mind that a considerable percentage of the world’s population are short-sighted, there must be a fair few short-sighted people in Longsight, which is possibly the ultimate example of Mancunian irony, or should that be eye-rony?!

I wear my specs most of the time. I only really take them off for being in water, or going to sleep. I take them off for having a shower, or if I’m going swimming. There were also the occasional other sporting activities in my school days which necessitated the removal of my eyewear, stuff like trampolining, but I last did any of that malarkey donkey’s years ago, so it would just be swimming these days. If I am going for a workout, I hardly need to take my specs off to go on a treadmill or an exercise bike. In fact, I need them on so I can programme the damn machines for how many minutes of workout I want!

Space Invader Funko Pop

No, you’re not seeing things. That is a bright green space invader! It’s a Funko Pop, which I bought on Saturday at the Museum of Science and Industry in town. I’m going back there this weekend, though, as I’ve now booked a ticket for Power Up. That’s what I was hoping to go to, but they’d sold out, so I’m returning more prepared this weekend, lol! I probably should have the space invader here around Computer Corner, shouldn’t I?! It would be suitably nerdy!

Talking of suitably nerdy, I wore this t-shirt (above) which I saw in a shop in the Trafford Centre recently, and just had to get it! I am always using the “Not Found” error, usually if there’s any suggestion that a person can ever have too many books! I will often comment…

Error 404: “Too Many Books” Not Found.

Please Enter “Not Enough Bookshelves” and Retry.

Hopefully, I’ll wear it again this coming weekend when I return to have a mosey around MOSI and get to visit the Power Up event, which is a chance to play lots of retro video games! I’m not the greatest at video games, I tend to hit the wrong buttons and lose lives, lol, but I still like them, and they remind me of being a kid in the late 70s and early 80s, and the days when Dad used to bring computers home from work sometimes, and then we got our own computer as a family. It was Dad who showed me how to write basic programs in BASIC – essentially doing what would be called coding nowadays.

I even bought a book at MOSI, that being Lost In a Good Game, by Pete Etchells. The sub-heading is Why We Play Video Games and What They Can Do For Us.

Anyway, after my visit to the Museum of Science and Industry, I made my way from Castlefield onto Deansgate, and after visiting Forsyth’s for a few music-related bits and bobs, I entered Waterstone’s. You’re not even surprised, are you?! I can tell! You will be even less surprised to discover that books were purchased, including two more Object Lessons books, those being Burger, by Carol J. Adams, and Shopping Mall, by Matthew Newton. I also bought A Short History of Drunkenness, by Mark Forsyth. It sounded interesting, and potentially amusing, to read about the history of excessive booze consumption and people getting ratarsed through the ages!

Actually, all three of those would present opportunities for my oft-mentioned Relevant Reads idea. You could read Burger in a diner or fast-food establishment, Shopping Mall at the Trafford Centre or other similar retail outlet, and the book about drunkenness in a pub, or even a brewery! Even if you couldn’t organise the proverbial piss-up in a brewery, surely you could at least manage to read about piss-ups in said establishment?!

You could even read Don’t You Forget About Me whilst listening to the song of the same name by Simple Minds! The book is by Mhairi McFarlane, and it’s another recent purchase, although, as you can probably tell, I’m still pretty much in non-fiction mode at the moment. Still not really ventured back into the realm of novels yet. If a book shares its title with a song, though, that just makes me think about the song far too much! Any time I catch sight of a copy of I Know This Much Is True, by Wally Lamb, I instantly think of True by Spandau Ballet! It’s impossible not to if you’re an 80s nut like me!

Actually, some do it on purpose, and name their book after a song title. For instance, What’s New, Pussycat? by Alexandra Potter, which I read some years ago now. That was deliberate on the part of the author as there was a distinct theme of songs by Sir Tom Jones running through it, and the main protagonist was called Delilah! The edition I have put on List Challenges is not the one I had, but in the Google search, that one was too blurred for some odd reason, I couldn’t get a good image of it, so I have had to go with a different cover, and I don’t like doing that!

Of course, the weekend just gone marked the start of the new Premier League season, and my lads were at home on the Sunday, so it was back to Old Trafford for me, and back in my second home – the Stretford End.

As they might put it on the telly, any viewers of a Chelsea-supporting nature should look away now…

United 4 Chelsea 0 11th Aug 2019

For much of the game, it was quite close, actually, and the visitors hit the crossbar on a number of occasions. Thankfully, we have a much-improved defence, especially as two of our three new signings this summer were bought to shore up our back four! We acquired Harry Maguire from Leicester City as a centre back, and Aaron Wan-Bissaka, from Crystal Palace, as a full back, and they both impressed on Sunday! Wan-Bissaka particularly stood out for me, as he had done during pre-season games, and I have taken a considerable liking to him already!

We went ahead on 18 minutes thanks to a Marcus Rashford penalty, after Rashy had been brought down. VAR (Video Assisted Refereeing) has come in this season in the Premier League, and that was one of the incidents which was checked, but it was an obvious penalty and didn’t take long for them to say so! Even then, Chelsea still threatened, and I would have been quite happy to take a 1-0 win, but there was a spell midway through the second half when we just blew them away with two goals in quick succession, and that pretty much killed Chelsea off! Anthony Martial made it 2-0 on 65 minutes, and then only two minutes later, Marcus Rashford got his second goal of the game with probably the best goal of the match to make it 3-0, and I think our visitors got the message that it wasn’t their day!

I had mentioned that we signed three players for our first team this summer, and the two defenders started the game, but we also saw the introduction of Daniel James, a winger, who came on as a sub, and he scored our 4th goal with about 8 minutes to go! His dad passed away just before he signed for United, so he dedicated his goal to him. Coincidentally, after coming on as a sub, it took him only 7 minutes on the pitch before he scored his goal. Back in 1996-97, a new summer signing also came on as a sub in a home game, albeit against Blackburn Rovers, and he scored after only 7 minutes on the pitch. That player? Our current manager, Ole Gunnar Solskjaer! I hope Dan James is going to be as good as the last Welsh winger we had in our first team, a certain Mr Ryan Joseph Giggs…

It was the joint biggest win over Chelsea in a match I have been to. The previous time I saw Manchester United stuff Chelsea 4-0 was 25 years ago at Wembley in the 1994 FA Cup Final! Our first Premier League and FA Cup Double was achieved on 14th May 1994 with a 4-0 thrashing of the London side at the old Wembley Stadium, courtesy of two penalties from Eric Cantona, and goals in open play from Mark Hughes and Brian McClair.

Talking of London, I actually acquired some books in the capital back in June when we went down the day before my mum’s birthday for a visit to Hamley’s and Afternoon Tea at Claridge’s – there were a couple of bookshops at Euston Station, and we had a bit of time before getting our train back to Manchester Piccadilly, so I acquired one novel, Our Stop, by Laura Jane Williams, and two non-fiction books, My Sh*t Therapist, by Michelle Thomas, and Walk the Lines, by Mark Mason. In this book, he sets out to walk the length of the London Underground. I already have a book by the same author, Move Along Please, which I really should get around to reading, lol, and that one is about bus travel.

I think that’s about it for now. Probably covered everything I needed to witter on about. There are now 110 books on the 2019 blog list on List Challenges, so that’s not too bad considering I didn’t even start blogging this year until April, and my lads are off to a winning start as the new season gets under way. I’ve got new specs, Ole’s at the wheel, and all’s well! Until next time, take care and Happy Reading!

Joanne x x x

Books mentioned in this blog entry…

  • Sock – Kim Adrian
  • Eye Chart – William Germano
  • Lost In a Good Game – Pete Etchells
  • Burger – Carol J. Adams
  • Shopping Mall – Matthew Newton
  • A Short History of Drunkenness – Mark Forsyth
  • Don’t You Forget About Me – Mhairi McFarlane
  • I Know This Much Is True – Wally Lamb
  • What’s New, Pussycat? – Alexandra Potter
  • Our Stop – Laura Jane Williams
  • My Sh*t Therapist – Michelle Thomas
  • Walk the Lines – Mark Mason
  • Move Along Please – Mark Mason

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Filed under Books, Childrens' Books, Computer Corner, Food & Drink, Football, List Challenges, Manc Stuff!, Music, My Bookworm History, Non-Fiction, Object Lessons, Ongoing Concerns, Sports, Travel

Science Fiction and Cheeky Nando’s

Tallest structures in the world 2019

Hello again, fellow Bookworms,

Trying to decide what to read next! Also got to give some thought to holiday reading. OK, so my Kindle will be coming on my jollies, so there’s plenty of ebooks on that, and there is always the chance I will find some book or other while I’m away and come home with some reading matter as a souvenir, but I usually do take a physical book or two away with me.

However, there’s still some weeks to go, and I still need to decide what to read now, never mind when I’m on the plane or sunning myself overseas! So, what I could do with, and this is a concept that might be familiar to other bookworms, particularly on Facebook and particularly if you’re a fellow Potterhead… the Book of Requirement. In the Harry Potter series, I think it might be around the 5th book where this comes in, there’s a Room of Requirement at Hogwarts. A room that isn’t always there, but makes itself appear and become available when it’s needed, which it does for Dumbledore’s Army when Hermione and others form the resistance movement against Umbridge and all the dark stuff that’s going on by then…

Thus, someone came up with the idea, in a meme, that there should be a book that turns itself into whichever book it is that is right for you at that time! A book that might, sometimes, be blank, but then when you’re having one of those “I don’t know what to read next” times, you open that book, and it is whichever book is just right for you at that time. The Book of Requirement! If there was such a book, that’s what I could do with right now, lol!

patronus is a bookworm

As for the Harry Potter books, I’ve listed them all on the books mentioned in 2019 list on List Challenges, the 7 main books, anyway. I’m not going through all the spin-offs, I just wanted to raise the issue of the Room of Requirement so you got the idea about the Book of Requirement concept.

Someone once said, and I think it might have been Margaret Atwood, that the book to read is the one that makes you think. Right now, though, the book to read is the one that will make me want to continue reading and help me get back in the mood for more books! I’ve been in a book slump since November, and my dad popped his clogs in January, then the funeral was in February, so I’ve only just been in the mood for reading since April, therefore it’s not necessarily about books that make me think, although I do read a lot of non-fiction so it is pretty true that they usually make me think, but the book to read is the book that makes you want to read even more!

Decisions, decisions! Fiction or non-fiction?

If non-fiction, what to read about? If fiction, which genre? Historical fiction? Science fiction? Fantasy? General fiction? Some people on social media suggest re-reading an old favourite when in a slump, but I just feel that I should read something I’ve not read before as I have absolutely stacks of unread and partially-read books…

I may have to resort to getting a few out and selecting a book by the time-honoured method…

Ip dip do, cat’s got flu, dog’s got chicken pox, out goes you!

Sometimes, that’s the only way to make a decision! I mentioned, last time out, that Howard’s End is On the Landing was on our landing, which seems appropriate enough, lol, but there are plenty of books on our landing. There are also some books downstairs, and, of course, in the book chest in the garage. And then, there are all the books in here. There are books right under Computer Corner as well as on top of surfaces near here!

I seem to have two copies of The Music Shop, by Rachel Joyce! One hardback and one paperback. I think it’s because I couldn’t find the hardback at the time, and found a copy of the paperback in a charity shop, thinking I would need it for the work’s book club, although they would have read that as I think I was on leave due to bereavement when they were reading it. My hardback copy was from a charity shop, too, so both copies of the book were pretty cheap!

Regular readers of my blog will recall the infamous Duplicate Books List from a year or two ago now. I think I actually ended up giving the duplicates to charity shops last time I was having a clear out, so I no longer have more than one copy of those books, and there were quite a lot on the list. I think it was at 17 or even 19 books at one point where I owned two copies of the same book! A lot of it was accidental, I genuinely forgot that I already owned those particular books, saw the book on offer in a charity shop and bought it, before realising that I already owned a copy! Occasionally, though, it was deliberate, as I knew I had a copy but didn’t know where it was, and bought another copy anyway with the intention of reading it fairly soon. However, I didn’t get around to it, as you might have guessed, lol!

Let’s see which books are lurking around here…

I’ve got Who’s the B*****d in the Black? here, the autobiography of former referee, Jeff Winter. I could read that, actually! It would be the third referee’s autobiography that I’ve read, as I’ve read The Rules of the Game, by Pierluigi Collina, and The Man in the Middle, by Howard Webb, in recent years. Could take the Jeff Winter book on holiday if I’ve finished the biography of Ole by then, as it might help alleviate the notorious Football Withdrawal Symptoms which come upon me once the season is over, and it very nearly is! Final game of the season this coming Sunday for my lads, at home to Cardiff City.

Although the lads have run out of steam in recent weeks, I still reckon we’ve done much better than we would have done if the Bus Parking One hadn’t been sacked the week before Christmas. Ole did give them belief back, but I think fitness and stamina need to be worked on to get us back to the side that used to be able to play to the final whistle as they did under Sir Alex. I expect that, with those who stay, and with the new signings, Ole will make it a priority to get a side together that keeps going for 90 minutes plus stoppage time.

We’ll be in the Europa League next season, which is a bit of a pain as those games are on Thursdays, so I’ll have to miss steel pans some weeks.

Funnily enough on the covers of the referee books, Howard Webb isn’t brandishing any cards. Pierluigi Collina is showing a yellow card on his, and Jeff Winter is showing a red card on his, giving some player the grand order of the early bath!

Still deliberating whether to take Dune with me on my jollies so I can read it on a dune in June. I was actually looking at my science fiction section the other day, and considering To Say Nothing of the Dog, by Connie Willis. That one actually sounds quite amusing. I could give that a go. I think it’s a time-travel novel by the sound of the blurb. I’m still considering Resistance is Futile, by Jenny T. Colgan, on the grounds of humour. It is “a riotous cocktail of geeks” according to Matt Haig.

OMG, there’s a Nando’s receipt in my copy of the Connie Willis book, lol! It’s for an order taken at 7:17pm on 2nd March 2018, and from the Nando’s in Piccadilly Gardens! Must have been in town after work and bought the book at Waterstone’s on Deansgate, and then gone for a cheeky Nando’s before I got the bus or tram home… I am partial to a cheeky Nando’s, it has to be said! On that occasion, I had the double chicken breast wrap, with chips, and a bottomless soft drink. I also had a reward on my Nando’s card, so I actually got money off! Eat in total was £8.50 which is pretty damn good!

There is a Waterstone’s receipt at the front of my copy of The Left Hand of Darkness, by Ursula K. Le Guin. It’s dated 2nd February 2018, so I bought that book exactly a month before the Connie Willis novel. According to the receipt, I also bought a brown notebook with dotted pages on that same occasion, plus The Stars My Destination, by Alfred Bester. I probably went for a cheeky Nando’s that night as well, although there’s no evidence of my dining destination for 2nd February! Not in any of my nearby books, anyway!

I still intend to read The Priory of the Orange Tree, by Samantha Shannon, but am thinking I might wait until I’m home from my jollies before starting that one due to the sheer physical size of the book. I don’t really want to be lugging it anywhere, so it’d be one I’d read here at home, and thus I don’t want to start it now and really get into it and then feel that I do have to cart it around with me, and I certainly don’t really want to be carting it around overseas! So, we shall wait until I am back from my hols before that one is commenced!

Another one I’m not about to attempt yet is S, by J J Abrams and Doug Dorst. I got this a couple of years ago now, as I recall, from a bookshop and cafe on Lever Street in town. I think it’s called Chapter One. The idea of this book is that it’s an old library book and it’s been written in by these two people, students I think, who write comments in the margins, and there’s loads of stuff in it between certain pages. Postcards and the likes… All part of the story, so it’s going to take some kind of strategy to work out how to tackle this one when I do read it. I think the guy at the shop said, at the time, that there’s a lot of stuff online about it, so I might look for online advice and ideas when I do get around to trying it. Again, a book I will probably want to keep at home. It’s not massively chunky,  well not compared to The Priory of the Orange Tree, lol, but with all the things inside it, I don’t want anything getting lost or mislaid once I do start reading it.

I have some seriously weird and random books, don’t I?! Regular readers of my blog won’t even be surprised, though, lol, as I’m a very random person and I do waffle on about anything and everything! It will be, mostly, about books, but then other ingredients are added to a blog entry… music, food and drink, Manchester United, holidays I’ve been on or am going on, various handicrafts… Somehow, though, it hasn’t put people off as I seem to have over 80 brave souls now who follow this blog!

I’ve always read anything which took my fancy. Some people tend to stick to one thing or another. Some like romance, some like horror, some crime… my late dad was very much into spy thrillers, he certainly read a lot of Len Deighton and John le Carré novels when I was a kid. That was during the Cold War era of the “Iron Curtain” so there was plenty of material for spy novels! He also liked war-themed stuff, but then again, his dad was a bomber pilot in the RAF during the Second World War, so that’s pretty understandable. He also liked poetry, as I mentioned recently, and I certainly share at least some of that – definitely the appreciation of Roger McGough, anyway!

I’ve liked fiction and non-fiction pretty  much alike since I first learned to read. I’ve even read a lot of reference books. That’s how much of a nerd I am, lol! I remember getting an encyclopaedia for Christmas one year as one of my pressies. I think I was about 8 or so. Anyway, there was a double-page spread of Flags of the Nations. Bear in mind this was about 1981 or so. Dad went through all the flags and wrote a C next to all the countries that were communist, so there were a lot of those back then! That’s when I asked him something of a hypothetical question at the time… If East Germany and West Germany ever became just Germany again, did my dad think they’d be western like us or eastern like the Russians? My dad thought they’d be eastern like the Russians. Then again, at that time, I think we all thought it would be how it was forever, we didn’t see the Berlin Wall coming down… that all came as a massive surprise when it happened at the end of 1989!

Obviously, towards the end of this year, it will be 30 years since the Berlin Wall came down, so I may well do a special blog on it, or at least part of a blog. Having been to Berlin in 2012, I have seen some slabs of the Wall, and also where the Wall was is marked throughout the city with two lines of cobbles and metal plates bearing the words Berliner Mauer 1961-1989. Fascinating city, I would love to go back there again.

Anyway, I think that’s about it for now, so until the next time I blog, take care and Happy Reading!

Joanne x x x

Books mentioned in this blog entry…

  • The Harry Potter series – J. K. Rowling
  • Howard’s End is On the Landing – Susan Hill
  • The Music Shop – Rachel Joyce
  • Who’s the B*****d in the Black? – Jeff Winter
  • The Rules of the Game – Pierluigi Collina
  • The Man in the Middle – Howard Webb
  • Ole – Ian MacLeay
  • Dune – Frank Herbert
  • To Say Nothing of the Dog – Connie Willis
  • Resistance is Futile – Jenny T. Colgan
  • The Left Hand of Darkness – Ursula K. Le Guin
  • The Stars My Destination – Alfred Bester
  • The Priory of the Orange Tree – Samantha Shannon
  • S – J. J. Abrams and Doug Dorst

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Filed under Authors, Autobiography/Biography, Books, Charity Shop Bargains, Chunky Monkeys, Computer Corner, Duplicate Books List, E-Books & Audiobooks, Facebook & Other Social Media, Fantasy Fiction, Food & Drink, Football, Half-Finished Books, List Challenges, Manc Stuff!, Music, My Bookworm History, Non-Fiction, Poetry, Science Fiction, The TBR Pile, Travel, YA Books

Blogging I am. Read it you should.

darth vader reading

Good afternoon, fellow Bookworms!

Happy Star Wars Day! May the 4th be with you! Sad that Chewy didn’t make it to today, though, as Peter Mayhew, who played Chewbacca, passed away yesterday. He will now be in a galaxy far, far away, though, and reunited with Princess Leia.

Don’t go over to the Dark Side… it’s too dark to read! Stay here with a good book and enjoy this blog, lol! I shall start with poetry, as I mentioned a few poetry books in my last blog and I have added a couple to my “books read” list. Poetry anthologies are something you can dip in and out of, though. I think, if you’ve read and enjoyed a significant amount of poems in any given book, you can say you’ve read that book. It’s not like a novel where you start off and read all the way through it, or at least try to. I mean, for instance, with Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Brontë, you start off with her at Gateshead with her mean aunt and spoilt brat cousins, and then you end up with her marrying Mr Rochester, don’t you? Poems, however, are not usually a continuation of the same story. They might be on a theme, you might have an anthology of love poems, for instance, or war poems, something I studied 30 years ago for my GCSEs, and I can recommend The Penguin Book of First World War Poetry should you wish to read any Wilfred Owen or Siegfried Sassoon.

If there’s anyone reading this at the moment who’s currently sitting their exams, good luck to you you for the remainder of your exams, hope they go well. Doesn’t matter if it’s GCSEs, A Levels, degrees, or any other qualifications. As I said, it’s three decades ago since I was sitting my GCSEs, so 28 years since my Bastard A Levels (worst exams ever) and 25 years since I was about to graduate from university.

Ice cream van’s outside, playing the Match of the Day theme as the jingle, lol! Nearly the end of the footy season now, though, ha ha! Only two more league games left. My lads are away to Huddersfield Town tomorrow, and then at home to Cardiff City next Sunday, on what would have been my grandma’s 100th birthday! She did make it to 95 and a half, though, so she did have a good innings!

Anyhow, back to books, and I have added You Took the Last Bus Home and The Luckiest Guy Alive to my list of books read in 2019, so those are the third and fourth books for this year so far. May the fourth be with you, indeed, lol!

I have a book here beside me at Computer Corner as I sit typing this blog, and it’s Jacob’s Room is Full of Books, by Susan Hill. You may recall that, some time ago, I read Howard’s End is On the Landing, by the same writer. Well, this is the follow-up! If she thinks Jacob’s room is full of books, which it may well be for all I know, and I hope it is, but she’s not seen mine! Mine is definitely full of books! A lot of them in huge piles, one or two of which, quite memorably, came toppling down one day in February a couple of years ago just after United had scored away to Leicester, lol! Never underestimate the excitement caused by a good goal, even my reading matter was celebrating!

My copy of Howard’s End is On the Landing is, appropriately enough, on our landing!

I had started the second of the Susan Hill books. Might resume that one, but am also considering The Rhine, by Ben Coates, which I have mentioned again recently. Wondering when it might be right to return to the fiction, though. Should I stick to factual stuff just to get through what is still a difficult time, or will something made up grab me?

I could actually start The Princess Diarist, by Carrie Fisher, which is here in Computer Corner, and it would be apt to start that on Star Wars Day, wouldn’t it?!

Star Wars musicians

One for Star Wars AND music nerds.

Talking of music, I’ve been playing steel pans for 6 months now, well just over that, and as part of Salford Steel, I will be off to the north-east in July, to North Shields for a steel band festival! Going to be a massed pans bit at one point, with over 100 of us all playing.

Oh, and, if you recall a couple of years ago, I mentioned on this blog the Learn to Play Day, well weekend, that Forsyths held in March – it was a national, or possibly international, thing where music shops offered free short lessons on various instruments… Well, I did that again in March this  year! You may recall I had a go on the accordion the last time, but this time there were strings attached, lol, as I had a go on the cello!

Me on the cello March 2019

I really enjoyed it! If space wasn’t such an issue, I wouldn’t mind learning the cello. It has quite a huge pitch range, around four octaves from its lowest possible note to the highest achievable note, so the register goes from the bass clef into the treble, essentially two octaves below middle C up to two octaves above it.

The keyboard is out again, been in the garage for ages, but it’s back in our house. Running on batteries at the mo as it needs a new adaptor for it to run on mains, but I was playing it the other day, attempting “Always On My Mind” and “Rent” like the Pethead that I am! I thought, seeing as my old keyboard was out again, I may as well play some Pet Shop Boys stuff and pretend to be Chris Lowe, ha ha! My niece, Charlotte, is learning the piano on keyboards, so that’s why it’s out. She’s still also learning the violin. Taking after her Auntie Jo and playing more than one instrument…

Ironically, when I watched the old Top of the Pops from 1987 the following day on BBC 4, Neil and Chris were actually on it and performing “Rent”! The Bee Gees were number one with “You Win Again” so I think we were on for some time around October 1987 at that point. Sad that there’s only Sir Barry Gibb left now. Very partial to their music, especially all the disco stuff from Saturday Night Fever that was out when I was a little girl in the late 70s!

I think that’s the music news caught up with. I am going out in a bit, to a quiz night, so this won’t be a particularly long blog compared to the previous couple, but it’ll have to do for now! I just wanted to get the Star Wars references in, given today’s date, lol! Otherwise, I know you’d find my lack of blog disturbing! So, until next time, take care and Happy Reading!

Joanne x x x

The Force was strong with these books during this blog entry…

  • Jane Eyre – Charlotte Brontë
  • The Penguin Book of First World War Poetry – Various
  • You Took the Last Bus Home – Brian Bilston
  • The Luckiest Guy Alive – John Cooper Clarke
  • Jacob’s Room is Full of Books – Susan Hill
  • Howard’s End is On the Landing – Susan Hill
  • The Rhine – Ben Coates
  • The Princess Diarist – Carrie Fisher

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Filed under Books, Food & Drink, Football, List Challenges, Music, My Bookworm History, Poetry, School, College & Uni Reading, Science Fiction, Sports, Television

September Review: Books, Bags, Pixels…

Planet Earth finished Sept 2018

Hello again, fellow Bookworms!

Time once more for a monthly review of the stuff I’ve been getting up to, and it does include two books being finished off this month, one ebook and one paperback. It also includes a lot of loom knitting and a not inconsiderable amount of fiddly little pixels, lol! As you can see from the above photo! I am not sure when I last blogged, it might have been just before I went to the craft show, in which case you wouldn’t have known about the pixels as I discovered them by chance at the Creative Crafts Show on 8th September.

I had gone there looking for wool and for loom knitting stuff, and I certainly found some wool, but I chanced upon a stall run by The Craft Dookit, which was offering Pixelhobby kits and accessories and where you could do a make and take pixellated keyring! So, I paid the necessary and made a keyring, choosing a snowman design. I also bought some other kits while I was there, some keyrings and magnets, and the Planet Earth kit which you can see at the top. Yeah, before you ask, it did make me think of the Duran Duran song, but I guess you worked that out, knowing what an 80s girl I am, lol!

The Planet Earth kit does look very science fiction, doesn’t it?!

Not that there has been any science fiction read in September. Both the books I finished this month have been non-fiction, those being Your Eighties, by Sarah Lewis, on my Kindle, and Good As You, by Paul Flynn, in paperback, celebrating 30 years of Gay Britain and covering the three decades from 1984 and the release of both “Relax” by Frankie Goes To Hollywood and “Smalltown Boy” by Bronski Beat, to 2014 and the go-ahead for gay weddings here in the UK. Not only did I love all the 80s music references, but a lot of the book focused on events up here in Manchester, so there were plenty of mentions for places I know. As I think I may have mentioned in previous blogs, I had a work placement in the late 90s, where the office was on the edge of the Gay Village, so I am not unfamiliar with that part of town.

I really need to get on with Snap, by Belinda Bauer, as I need to get a decent amount of it read for 16th October, and have just over a fortnight. I also need to get on with What Does This Button Do? That’s the autobiography of Iron Maiden frontman, Bruce Dickinson, and it’s the one my friend Sarah has lent me, so I need to get it read before we go to see Madness in December at the Manchester Arena. Two months to get on with it. May have to do some each night. It’s a hardback, so I don’t really want to be lugging it around, and wouldn’t want anything to happen to it anyway, as it isn’t my book.

The next book for the book club at work is Salmon Fishing In the Yemen, by Paul Torday. I haven’t actually read that one before, although I’ve had a copy for some time now. All the previous work book club choices have been re-reads for me, but this one isn’t. On the Kindle, there’s a couple of books which I am reading, and may well be my post-match reading matter. I’m already reading them at lunchtime at work, though. The Eighties: One Day, One Decade, by Dylan Jones, is about the Live Aid gig on 13th July 1985, so that’s my 80s music fix sorted, and Bookworm: A Memoir of Childhood Reading, by Lucy Mangan, is a book about books, so also right up my street! I was 12 when Live Aid took place, and was watching it on my telly. I still think, however cheesy it might sound, that “Rockin’ All Over The World” by Status Quo was the most appropriate song with which to open that gig! I have the DVD set of Live Aid. It has everything on it except Led Zeppelin, as they thought their performance was so bad that they didn’t want it on the box set because they were too embarrassed!

Sometimes I feel like I would be better off reading during the bloody match, though! Just keeping everything crossed that Jose gets the boot sooner rather than later! How can the board justify him remaining as manager when we’re losing?! It’s apparently our worst start to a Premier League season. Yes, that’s right. Even worse than under Moyesy in 2013-14! And Moyes was out of his depth as our manager, so the so-called “Special One” (more like the Boring One) being worse than Moyesy…

I know you can’t entertain ALL the time, but we can and should be able to expect our team to entertain MOST of the time! The style of play is shite, to use a technical term, and it’s not even as if it’s getting the results, is it?! It’s not even effective! The players hate it, the fans hate it… and if we don’t do well enough in the league, the business partners aren’t gonna like it either, so if that’s all the bloody directors think about, they need to wake up and smell the coffee because they NEED the performances on the pitch to be winning and attractive in order for the performances on the financial front to be good too! Whatever it costs to sack Jose and pay him off would be worth it if we can get a manager in who does things the right way! Get back to attack-minded football, give our forwards and midfielders free rein to entertain and bang in the goals, bring up a few more from the youth team, and only criticise players in private!

Defend in public, throw the teacups behind closed doors! That’s how you get players on board, that’s how you retain their trust! Then they know that even if they’ve had a total ‘mare and they know they’re going to get the hairdryer treatment, as it was known when Sir Alex was manager, they know that the gaffer will stick up for them in the press conference, and the kick up the arse will only happen either in the dressing room, or in the manager’s office at the training ground. That is the way things SHOULD be done! I wouldn’t mind if the manager came out with Arsene Wenger’s old catchphrase and told the press that he didn’t see the incident! Wenger, like Fergie, knew how to treat players. That’s why he was Arsenal’s manager for over 20 years.

Pixel piano and owl

Anyway, enough of that. Back to the crafts, I think. Obviously, the pixels have been a big part of this month’s creativity, especially as one of my orders arrived on Wednesday, from Crafter’s Cavern. I’m still awaiting an order from The Craft Dookit, though, with a couple of kits. As I have done cross-stitch, there is a similarity, although you’re putting diddy little pixels onto baseplates rather than threading some floss and stitching it onto aida or evenweave. The pixel shades all have colour codes, so in that respect it’s similar to stitching! There are keyrings, which are 11 pixels by 14, little squares which are 24 by 24, and standard baseplates, which are 40 by 50 pixels. You can also get XL pixels which cover 4 prongs on a baseplate (2 by 2) and are less fiddly – you can put those in by hand rather than needing tweezers!

That’s the latest finished bag, by the way! I have now started another, although the second picture shows an earlier picture of the scarf I have started. The cream wool is now being used for my latest bag, as I’m onto brown wool on the scarf – I have two huge balls of this stuff, one cream, one brown, it has a bit of a towelling feel to it, Bernat Blanket it’s called, and I’m alternating colours, about 12cm of one, then I change over to the other. On my second lot of brown now. I think of it as coffee and cream. As well as finishing  the bag, I also finished a purple snood.

That’s the snood on the left. On the right is my niece, taking after me on the music front as well as being Junior Bookworm! I came home from work one night this week to be treated to a violin recital from Charlotte! She’s just got a new violin – gone from a quarter-sized one to a half-sized one now that she’s bigger. She’s really good at playing, really fluent with it, and played us a few tunes, including the Can Can! I will be busy this coming week getting a card and gift wrap – it’s nearly my nephew’s 2nd birthday, and we’ll be having the party next weekend! Reuben also likes books, as well as diggers and dinosaurs! I understand he is also partial to Thomas the Tank Engine! Anyway, Auntie Jo is going to be busy!

Oh, and Slimming World. Nearly forgot. I have now lost over 1 and a half stones! The Monday after the craft show, I reached that particular milestone exactly, and have dropped another 3lbs since then, so I’m only 4lbs off a 2 stone loss… that’s my next aim. I have changed my target weight. I may yet change again, but at the moment it is a weight that would give me a 2 and a half stone loss in total from what I started at when I first got on the scales on my sister’s birthday in June!

I think that’s about it for now. I’ve probably covered everything… Books, loom knitting, pixels, footy, music, Reuben’s birthday, Slimming World… yep, that’s pretty much it… Hopefully there will be a Waterstone’s book club to report on in October, everything crossed for 16th October and for a few people to turn up! Until the next time I blog, take care and Happy Reading!

Joanne x x x

Books mentioned in this blog entry…

  • Your Eighties – Sarah Lewis
  • Good As You – Paul Flynn
  • Snap – Belinda Bauer
  • What Does This Button Do? – Bruce Dickinson
  • Salmon Fishing In the Yemen – Paul Torday
  • The Eighties: One Day One Decade – Dylan Jones
  • Bookworm: A Memoir of Childhood Reading – Lucy Mangan

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Filed under Books, E-Books & Audiobooks, Food & Drink, Football, Handbag Books, Loom Knitting, Manc Stuff!, Month in Review, Music, Non-Fiction, Ongoing Concerns, Pixelhobby, Rants, School, College & Uni Reading, Science Fiction, Television

August Review – Books, Bees, and a Bag

Bookstore Conwy Wales 29 August 2018

Me in Hinton’s of Conwy, when I was in Wales on Wednesday.

Hello again, fellow Bookworms! Or should that be Book Dragons, given that I was in Wales a couple of days ago?!

Have had a very nice week off work to finish August. Monday was a bank holiday here, and then I have been using up annual leave for the rest of the week as I can only carry 5 days or fewer over into my new leave year which starts in September. Hence I have been out and about this week and the weather has been great! You can have some really good days out here in the UK if the weather’s not too shite (which is a technical term, as you know by now)! We’ve actually been having a decent summer this year, helped by that heatwave in July! Usually we have to go abroad for that sort of weather! Actually needing sun lotion and after-sun in this country is something of a novelty, hence many of us still go on about the Summer of 1976!

Anyway, never mind me waffling on about the weather, another month has come to an end, and therefore it’s time for the monthly review blog, and the most successful month so far this year for finishing books off, as I have finished SIX books in August! Yay! I’ve also finished off a couple of items I’ve been making on my knitting looms, so I can show you those as well! Right, all aboard for August’s Review of the Month blog… Fasten your seatbelts and prepare for books, bees, bara brith, a bag and a baby hat…

Well, August’s first two finishes were both early in the month and they were two I loved and gave 5 stars to, although they were both very different to one another. The first was Notes On a Nervous Planet, by Matt Haig, and that was followed very closely by The Man I Think I Know, by Mike Gayle, both of them finished off within the space of 24 hours! I had discovered the Mike Gayle novel thanks to the Zoe Ball Book Club on her Sunday morning show on ITV, and gave it a go on the strength of that, so thank you, Zoe, for choosing that one as one of your ten books!

Back in the 90s, I used to think she was a bit annoying, actually, probably as she’d jumped on the football bandwagon without knowing her stuff and thus not helping the cause of female supporters, especially the likes of myself who want to be seen and respected as clued-up knowledgeable fans just as much as male supporters, but in recent times, with running this book club on telly, I’ve seen a different side of her. She’s a couple of years older than me, so I guess it’s that difference between being some annoying mid 20s bimbo back in the 90s, and now being middle aged, as I am myself, and obviously matured a lot!

Anyway, enough waffling on about Zoe Ball, and back to the books. Book club at Waterstone’s seems to be either dead or in intensive care, lol, although I do have one at work, despite missing the most recent meeting because I’ve been on leave all this week, but I did eventually finish Wigs On the Green, by Nancy Mitford, which I’d been up to around 75% of the way through when it was supposed to be the meeting night, only to end up sitting in the coffee shop area of Waterstone’s Deansgate for around 45 minutes on my own like Billy No-Mates, and then realising that no bugger else was going to turn up, so I might as well have a shufty, buy some books to cheer myself off, because I was a bit pissed-off to say the least, and then go for a Cheeky Nando’s before getting a tram home! As one does!

For a quick read, and I mean quick, my next finish was probably the shortest adult-orientated book I’ll have read all year, the 100 page Alan Bennett quickie, The Lady In the Van. OK, so Fantastic Mr Fox, by Roald Dahl, is probably the shortest book I’ve read this year, but that is a children’s book, so this is the shortest I’ve read which is aimed at an adult readership, and is a biography of the cantankerous old bat who lived in her clapped-out van in Alan’s front yard for quite a number of years! I guess he was a bit too kind to her in the first place and she took advantage of that and spent the rest of her life there.

Little bag finished August 2018

It was also around this time that I finished my bag. Having acquired some actual knitting looms from Abakhan Fabrics in town, I set about making some stuff, and this was my first creation. The bag itself is made on that long rectangular loom, and the handle was made by using the “knitting fork” or lucet, which you also see in the photo – that two-pronged wooden thing with the hole in it. The variegated purple bits give a bit of a contrast to the sparkly white main bit of the bag.

Me with a bee Manchester 31st August 2018

Bee In the City – Manchester, 23rd July to 23rd September 2018

I’d gone into town to do a bit of bee-spotting, because, as I have mentioned before, Bee In the City is on in Manchester, and the surrounding area, at the moment, and runs up until 23rd September, I think, so there’s still around 3 weeks left to go bee hunting, and I’ve been doing a lot of that today, and will be doing more of it over the weekend. Certainly tomorrow. I have the app on my phone, so as well as taking photos of the bees, I’m also entering the codes on my mobile to unlock the bees and count how many I’ve seen. In terms of book-related stuff, there are bees in some of the libraries in town, certainly in Central Library, and I think there’s a bee in the John Rylands Library on Deansgate, so I will have to investigate that!

French Revolutions finished August 2018

On Sunday, just before my Big Week Off, lol, I finished off the utterly brilliant French Revolutions, by Tim Moore, which has now been added to the roll of honour featuring books which have made me laugh my arse off over the years! If you like travel writing, sports writing, and/or you are in need of a damn good laugh, you should definitely read French Revolutions! It’s up there with Penguins Stopped Play, by Harry Thompson! I read that one some years ago now, and that was hilarious! You don’t even have to be into cricket to enjoy Penguins Stopped Play! Just read it!

Bara Brith and Coffee in Conwy 29th August 2018

Bara brith and a cup of coffee, Conwy, North Wales

That’s in case you were wondering what the hell bara brith is when I listed it with all the B words at the start of the blog, lol! It’s a kind of tea loaf from Wales, and Mum and I had a slice each when we were in Conwy on Wednesday. I am well aware that many of my followers are not from the UK, so I guess you would’t have known about certain items of food and drink from these shores! If I’ve got any Welsh book dragons following this blog, they’ve probably known for donkey’s years, but I know that quite a few of you are more far-flung, including the USA and Canada. The last time I recall knowing my follower count, I had either 77 or 78 followers, I think, so thank you for deciding to follow this mad blog and I hope you’re enjoying this entry!

By the way, the book I am holding in the photo at the top of the blog is not one that I actually bought, but I did purchase The Pebbles On the Beach, by Clarence Ellis, when I was in Hinton’s of Conwy.

Twisting My Melon finished 30 August 2018

I was in the Lake District yesterday, but was spending time in the holiday park with my sister, her partner and my niece and nephew, including sitting in a hot tub, which was lovely, and I definitely want to do that again! Therefore, I didn’t get out and about near the Lakes and didn’t get to go in any shops, so no books were purchased. However, I did get to finish off one of my ebooks during the journey there and back! Twisting My Melon, by Shaun Ryder, became my sixth finish for August, and my 25th finish for 2018 so far, thus meaning I have 5 more books to go to meet my Goodreads Challenge for this year! Woohoo!

Little hat finished 31st August 2018

Bringing you right up to date, as this blog draws to its close, this is the little hat I finished earlier, although it would only be big enough for a new baby. It will probably go on the stall at the church Christmas fair later this year. The size of the circle determines the size of the hat. I bought a set of four, and the biggest one would be too big, and would probably make a snood, but the next biggest one would probably make a good adult-sized hat. The third one might make a kid’s hat or at least an older baby or toddler, but that small one would be for a newborn, probably.

I’ve also been taking some books to charity shops in Monton and Eccles while I’ve been off. Occasionally, I need to do this to make way for newer purchases. Sometimes I just have to figure out “Am I going to read this?” or “Am I going to finish this?” If not, then I might as well give it away, especially if I’m likely to get a cheap copy from a charity shop in the future should I ever decide I do wish to read it! Some books crop up in charity shops all the time, so there’s a good shout that I’d get hold of it again if I do want to read it, but I’ve given away my previous copy.

Well, that’s about it for now, so I’d better get this published while we’re still just about in August, lol! Until the next blog entry, take care and Happy Reading!

Joanne x x x

Books mentioned in this blog entry…

  • Notes On a Nervous Planet – Matt Haig
  • The Man I Think I Know – Mike Gayle
  • Wigs On the Green – Nancy Mitford
  • The Lady In the Van – Alan Bennett
  • Fantastic Mr Fox – Roald Dahl
  • French Revolutions – Tim Moore
  • Penguins Stopped Play – Harry Thompson
  • The Pebbles On the Beach – Clarence Ellis
  • Twisting My Melon – Shaun Ryder

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