Monthly Archives: April 2017

Mermaid Mystery

Books bought 29th April 2017

Hello again, fellow Bookworms!

“I’m on the toilet at the 9:30 Club, and I’m wondering how mermaids pee.”

Isn’t that a brilliant opening line?! People get drawn to books because of their covers (we know we shouldn’t judge books by their covers, but we still do, lol), and often because of the blurb, but a good opening line can do it for you as well! It’s what attracted me to The Upside of Unrequited, by Becky Albertalli, when I was in Waterstone’s yesterday! She is also the author of Simon vs the Homo Sapiens Agenda, which is on my notorious TBR list. Indeed, it’s in the rainbow tower of books!

The other book in the photo, Anna and the Swallow Man, by Gavriel Savit, is set in Poland in 1939, so a WWII setting, with a child separated from her parents, certainly from her father, early on, so not unlike The Book Thief in that respect. Anyway, as you can see here, from this photo, Savit’s novel came with a freebie…

Book and bookmarks 29th April 2017

Actually, my copy had TWO free matching bookmarks in it, and I also picked up the free postcard while I was in Waterstone’s, although that’s for a completely different book, Checkmate, by Malorie Blackman. Must admit I’ve yet to read any of her books, but I’ve certainly heard of them, Noughts & Crosses for definite. The postcard will no doubt end up being used as a bookmark anyway, lol! Offering free matching bookmarks is a pretty common promotional method, usually for the book shop to put one in each copy or put a pile on the table alongside the book they are promoting, although occasionally a book might actually have a detachable bookmark, such as the time I bought The President’s Hat, by Antoine Laurain, a book club book a few years ago. (That was a novel about the former French president, François Mitterrand, by the way, NOT about Washington Wiggy!)

I got another couple of books read while I was in Waterstone’s, so I am up to 24/30 on my Goodreads Reading Challenge. I admit these were kids’ books, as seen above, but I read widely anyway, from children’s books to epic novels, and I’ve recently got a few long term ones off my notorious Ongoing Concerns list, so why not read a couple of quickies in Waterstone’s?! They were Tidy, by Emily Gravett, and The Day the Crayons Came Home, by Drew Daywalt, which is the follow-up to the brilliant The Day the Crayons Quit, which I have also read, probably last year! I’ve mentioned it on my blog this year, though.

Charlotte is now moving on, though, more towards books which take more than a day to read, books with chapters. As mentioned recently, they’re reading The Wind in the Willows, or certainly parts of it, at her school. I don’t think I’ve ever read it, but I certainly remember the animated TV adaptation in the 80s, as I’m pretty sure Mr Toad was voiced by the legendary Sir David Jason. Then again, in a year or so, it’ll be Reuben’s turn for some of those books from which Charlotte is moving on. Reuben’s on the board books, he’s 6 months old at present. He has his mum, dad and big sister reading to him, so hopefully my little nephew will also love books as much as my niece does.

Obviously, in the next day or two, I’m going to have to do the April Review on here, so I’m not really focusing on the OCs right now as that’ll be a big part of the monthly summary of bookworm activity, but I’ve been making some progress with Pet Shop Boys, Literally in recent days, Chris Heath‘s account of the duo’s first tour in 1989. At the last count, I was on for page 212, and had thus read 62% of the book. I mentioned in a previous blog, earlier this year, that 2017 marks 30 years since I became a Pethead during the course of 1987, so it’s part of the anniversary celebrations of 3 decades of yours truly appreciating the musical talents and output of Neil Francis Tennant and Christopher Sean Lowe!

The OC list is still currently standing at 8 books, as I have still not decided on the books to replace The Saffron Trail and Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist. I did think, though, about honouring a couple of authors, one who’d passed away recently, and one who would have celebrated his 69th birthday on 28th April, but who passed away in 2015. We have recently lost Robert M. Pirsig on 24th April, the author of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, while the late great Sir Terry Pratchett would have turned 69 on Friday, so I was giving some thought to Mort, the fourth book of the Discworld series.

I’ve still got Diary of an Oxygen Thief, an anonymous novella, on my TBR pile, but I shall have to check again how long it is, or rather, how short, as it could be a one-day read which would not need to join the OC list any more than those children’s books I read at Waterstone’s! The Ongoing Concerns are books which are going to take me at least a while to read, they’re not going to be one-day or even overnight reads.

I might just read that one I bought earlier, though, the Becky Albertalli book… It would be my YA replacement for Nick & Norah and, after all, I’d also like to know how mermaids pee! Until the next time I blog, which won’t be very long in coming, lol, take care and Happy Reading!

Joanne x x x

Books mentioned in this blog entry…

  • The Upside of Unrequited – Becky Albertalli
  • Simon vs the Homo Sapiens Agenda – Becky Albertalli
  • Anna and the Swallow Man – Gavriel Savit
  • The Book Thief – Markus Zusak
  • Checkmate – Malorie Blackman
  • Noughts & Crosses – Malorie Blackman
  • The President’s Hat – Antoine Laurain
  • Tidy – Emily Gravett
  • The Day the Crayons Came Home – Drew Daywalt
  • The Day the Crayons Quit – Drew Daywalt
  • The Wind In the Willows – Kenneth Grahame
  • Pet Shop Boys, Literally – Chris Heath
  • The Saffron Trail – Rosanna Ley
  • Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist – Rachel Cohn & David Levithan
  • Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance – Robert M. Pirsig
  • Mort – Sir Terry Pratchett
  • Diary of an Oxygen Thief – Anonymous
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Filed under Authors, Autobiography/Biography, Books, Childrens' Books, Goodreads, Half-Finished Books, Historical Fiction, Junior Bookworms, Music, Ongoing Concerns, Television, The TBR Pile, Travel, YA Books

Good Morning, Judge!

Good evening, fellow Bookworms!

The joys of jury service, eh?! Last week, I wasn’t on a case, this week I am, but there’s still a lot of hanging around in the jurors’ lounge and thus plenty of reading time to keep bookworms happy, lol! Especially if a point of law needs to be raised and the judge doesn’t need us jurors for that… Thus, long lunches and plenty of book time! Therefore the OC List might be unrecognisable soon with some long-standing books coming off the list at last! You’ll remember that I finished off An Equal Music last week, along with The People’s Songs, and now another couple which have been on the list for some time, along with the Vikram Seth novel, have also been finished and joined the ranks of the Goodreads Challenge instead!

By the way, tonight’s court-themed blog title comes courtesy of a hit by 10CC back in the 70s! I’m not expecting the case to go on too long, which is a good thing because I’m not sure how many more legally-themed songs I can think of! We’ve had Love In The First Degree, All Rise and now Good Morning Judge! Talking of Love In The First Degree, it’s quite a co-incidence that I should use a Bananarama song title for a blog title last week and then we hear the news that Bananarama are making a comeback! I’m sure that’s just a fluke and we’ll not be hearing similar news for Blue and 10CC!

If I hadn’t been going through legally-themed titles, I might have gone with A Little Respect for today’s blog, as it’s the birthday of Andy Bell from Erasure, and I have loved them since my teens, back in the late 80s – second only to the Pet Shop Boys as far as my musical favourites go, and I’ve seen Andy and Vince in concert several times, almost as many times as I’ve seen Neil and Chris!

Right, anyway, so, where were we?! Ah, yes, finishing off books and getting them off the OC list because I’ve had a lot of time to kill on jury service, lol! So, yesterday I finished off The Saffron Trail at last, a really great book with a really good plot twist near the end! I’d actually got that book in October last year because I wanted something set in Morocco, or at least partially set in Morocco, to take on my jollies with me to Marrakech, and a Google search of “books set in Morocco” threw up that one along with a few others, the blurb looked good, and I managed to get a copy of Rosanna Ley‘s book from W H Smith’s in the Trafford Centre. Waterstone’s had some novels by the same author, but not that particular one, but WH Smith had a copy, so I was in luck. I got a bit read before and during my jollies, but I have read most of it since then, and it has reminded me of my time in Morocco in November.

I still want to slap Ted Robinson from The Saffron Trail, though! Well, actually, punch his lights out for being a total arsehole, or asshole as they’d say in the States, as he’s one of the American characters in the plot. He’s on the Literary Slap List, that’s for certain!

That one had been on 55% for a while, along with Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist, by Rachel Cohn and David Levithan, but I finished that one off today, before making further progress with City of Bones, by Cassandra Clare, the first of the Mortal Instruments series, which is now up to 21% according to Goodreads.

Before we come on to the usual “what the hell should I read next?” dilemma, lol, I saw an interesting book-related question on Facebook earlier, concerning books which you may have originally hated, or at least not liked very much, first time around, but then you read them again later and really enjoyed them. Not sure I’ve experienced that as such, yet, but there is one book I remember having to read when I was at high school, round about 30 or 31 years ago now, the academic year of 1986-87, anyway, when I was in my third year at high school (year 9 as it’s known these days).

It was one of those instances where the whole class reads the same book. The book was The Gun, by C S Forester, and it didn’t really float my boat as a 13 or 14 year old. However, this is now 2017, I am now 44 years old, and if I were to get hold of a copy, I might try it and see if it grabs me this time round. I think they picked the book at the time in the hope it would appeal to the lads. I was a teenage girl and the thought of reading about some huge-arse cannon used in some silly battle or other didn’t seem like the sort of reading matter which would be up my street.

As I said before, though, we’ve moved on 30 years or so, I’m an adult, and a very random reader with pretty broad tastes! I read quite widely, I like to think, although there’s some stuff which really doesn’t appeal to me – such as horror or books by known right-wingers, as I have no wish to read something that’s either going to scare the living crap out of me or annoy me and get my blood pressure up! I’m not too thrilled about crime fiction, either, although I’ll give it a go as long as the plot isn’t too gory or scary!

I think I need a brew. On second thoughts, no. I KNOW I need a brew! I shall be back shortly with a cuppa… cannot possibly decide what to add to the OC List next unless there’s some tea inside me…

Right, back again with a brew and the remainder of my birthday cake. Oh, and a special thank you to all of you who follow my blog! 50 of you now! Not bad at all for something I just started up in 2010 in order to amuse myself and see if anyone else was undeterred by my waffle! I do go on a bit! You may have noticed, lol!

So… let’s not put it off any longer… Having just finished another couple of books in the past couple of days, we go back to that age-old question of what the hell to read next! The eternal bookworm dilemma…

Let’s look at what I’ve just finished. We have The Saffron Trail, which is general fiction, and Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist, which is YA. So, if I were to replace like with like, we’re looking at one general fiction and one young adult to come off the sub’s bench, so to speak! But I could just disregard that and pick two completely different books to those which have come off the list. I could go with some fantasy and resume my Discworld progress with Mort, by Sir Terry Pratchett. It would give me a good laugh and be a really good size for my handbag. I’ve got I, Robot, by Isaac Asimov, here by Computer Corner, and that’s around the same size, physically, as Mort, so if I wished to attempt a bit of science fiction, there’s always that. Out on the landing, on one of the bookshelves, I have Ready Player One, by Ernest Cline, which is supposed to have an 80s setting to it, or at least a lot of 80s references in it.

Then again, there’s some of the “Prodigal Books” – those which once were lost, but had been found, lol! You may recall that four out of five of my “missing books” turned up. Just don’t start me on The God of Small Things, as I haven’t the foggiest when that disappeared, let alone where the hell it is! If you wish to revisit the sorry tale of my books going walkies, go back in the archives, you’ll probably need either February or March of this year, and blogs entitled Missing Words, and All The Books We Cannot See. However, there was a happy ending in Four Out of Five Ain’t Bad!

Of the Prodigal Books, most had been at least started, other than All The Light We Cannot See, plus the still-missing novel by Arundhati Roy (see above) but there’s three partially-started books – The English Patient, Thirteen Reasons Why, and A Man Called Ove. It occurred to me that if I were to resume Thirteen Reasons Why, plus either the Ondaatje or Backman, it would be a like for like substitution for the general fiction and YA I’ve just finished. However, for the general fiction, there’s the temptation to go with All The Light We Cannot See on the grounds that I could make serious inroads with this fairly chunky one while I’m still on jury service! Shorter reads can wait their bloody turn, lol!

Anyway, I’d probably better give some thought as to what to put in my bag for tomorrow. Perhaps I should take some which need getting on with… The Tobacconist, as it’s my current book club book, probably should be one of them, but we’ll see… I’m off to sort my books out, so if you wish to know which books I end up adding to the OC List, you’ll have to keep your eye out for email notification of my next blog, lol! Until then, take care and Happy Reading!

Joanne x x x

Books mentioned in this blog entry…

  • An Equal Music – Vikram Seth
  • The People’s Songs – Stuart Maconie
  • The Saffron Trail – Rosanna Ley
  • Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist – Rachel Cohn & David Levithan
  • City of Bones – Cassandra Clare
  • The Gun – C. S. Forester
  • Mort – Sir Terry Pratchett
  • I, Robot – Isaac Asimov
  • Ready Player One – Ernest Cline
  • The God of Small Things – Arundhati Roy
  • All The Light We Cannot See – Anthony Doerr
  • The English Patient – Michael Ondaatje
  • Thirteen Reasons Why – Jay Asher
  • A Man Called Ove – Fredrik Backman
  • The Tobacconist – Robert Seethaler

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Filed under Books, Computer Corner, Facebook & Other Social Media, Fantasy Fiction, Goodreads, Half-Finished Books, Historical Fiction, Humour, List Challenges, Literary Slap List, Music, Ongoing Concerns, The TBR Pile, YA Books

Pick of the Books!

OC list 22nd April 2017.jpg

Alright, pop pickers?! Not ‘alf! We’ve reached the top ten…

Hello again, fellow Bookworms!

Last blog as a 43 year old, lol! So, this is the before-birthday book briefing, as it were. Just to bring you up to date with the OC List, which is now looking like a chart top ten, except that books don’t really go down after they get to the top, I just finish reading them and they come off the list! Anyway, if you can imagine the theme music for Pick of the Pops on BBC Radio 2 on a Saturday afternoon, this is a sort of Pick of the Books…

Pick of the Pops theme

At number ten, slipping down a couple of places, we have City of Bones, by Cassandra Clare, the first book in the Mortal Instruments series. That’s at 12% according to my Goodreads account…

Number nine sees a new entry for the legendary travel writer, Bill Bryson, whose Neither Here Nor There, an account of his travels around Europe, enters our OC List with 13% of it read thus far!

Number eight is our highest new entry! The first book in Ally Carter‘s Gallagher Girls series, I’d Tell You I Love You, But Then I’d Have To Kill You, enters our OC list in 8th place, with 15% of it read! Certainly wins the award for longest book title currently on my OC List, and probably the longest title of anything I’ll be reading this year, lol!

At number 7, my current book club book, The Tobacconist, by Robert Seethaler, is at 21% on Goodreads and currently one of several non-movers on the charts.

Just above it, and hanging on in there despite very little movement, is Finding Audrey, by Sophie Kinsella, at number 6 on 29% and hoping it’s not got stuck in a rut.

Nul Points, by Tim Moore, a look at the biggest failures in the history of the Eurovision Song Contest, lol, is at number 5 and at the 30% read stage according to Goodreads. Eurovision is coming up once again fairly soon, so this was a recent new entry and it is establishing itself on the OC list!

At number 4 is Me and Earl and the Dying Girl, by Jesse Andrews, with me having read just over a third of this YA novel so far – 34% read according to Goodreads!

We actually have something chart-related at number 3, pop pickers, as Chris Heath is at that position with Pet Shop Boys, Literally, an account of their first tour, back in 1989. I am exactly halfway through this hardback at 50% read!

And, with The People’s Songs, by Stuart Maconie, having been finished recently and come off the list, we actually have a joint number one! Two books are tied for the top spot, each being 55% read at present!

We have Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist, by Rachel Cohn and David Levithan sharing first place with The Saffron Trail, by Rosanna Ley!

Well, that’s the Ongoing Concerns top ten for now, pop pickers! I expect some movement on the charts in the coming week, particularly as I’m definitely required in court on Monday as my second week of jury service gets under way! This is only a short blog, no long waffly one tonight, so until the next time, take care and Happy Reading!

Joanne x x x

Books mentioned in this blog entry…

  • City of Bones – Cassandra Clare
  • Neither here Nor There – Bill Bryson
  • I’d Tell You I Love You, But Then I’d Have To Kill You, Ally Carter
  • The Tobacconist – Robert Seethaler
  • Finding Audrey – Sophie Kinsella
  • Nul Points – Tim Moore
  • Me and Earl and the Dying Girl – Jesse Andrews
  • Pet Shop Boys, Literally – Chris Heath
  • The People’s Songs – Stuart Maconie
  • Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist – Rachel Cohn & David Levithan
  • The Saffron Trail – Rosanna Ley

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Filed under Books, Goodreads, Half-Finished Books, Humour, Music, Non-Fiction, Ongoing Concerns, Travel, YA Books

All Rise!

People's Songs finished 21 April 2017

Off the OC List – Another Stuart Maconie book finished!

Hello again, fellow Bookworms!

Once again, I was not needed in court, but I will be on Monday! Woo hoo! I phoned up after 6pm on Friday evening (it’s now the early minutes of Saturday morning here in the UK as I type), and all of us who started our jury service this last week are required to attend on Monday at 10:30am. Fine by me, and I shall pack a chunky book or two! Today’s court-themed blog title is thanks to the 2001 hit by Blue. Apologies to my sister for the previous one (Love In The First Degree) after she got that particular Bananarama song stuck in her head, lol!

This is the song in question for tonight’s title, for those unfamiliar with it…

Possibly The Saffron Trail or City of Bones as one of the books. Both of those are chunky, and I could aim to get a fair bit of either of those read. They’re at opposite ends of the OC scale… I’m over half-way through The Saffron Trail, by Rosanna Ley, but it’s kinda stalled at 55% for a while and needs “reviving” really. On the other hand, I only recently started City of Bones, by Cassandra Clare, but it seems quite a way behind on only 12%. One book I really should get on with, though, is The Tobacconist, by Robert Seethaler, as that’s my book club book at the moment.

The People’s Songs is now off the OC list and onto the Goodreads Challenge, though! My second Stuart Maconie book of this year, the third of his which I have read in total, was finished on Friday evening, taking my Goodreads Challenge to 20/30 – two thirds of my current target met before my birthday! Woo hoo! I think Maconie is one of my favourite non-fiction writers, along with Bill Bryson. He writes about stuff I like reading about, in other words music and travel, and he’s a fellow northerner – from Wigan, so not a million miles away from my neck of the woods! Been to Wigan a few times, as I’ve probably mentioned in previous blogs, lol!

Anyway, with another book off the OC list, time to add one to it, but which book to add? I have got a book in my handbag right now and I’m deliberating on I’d Tell You I Love You, But Then I’d Have To Kill You, by Ally Carter, but that would just add to all the YA on the OC list already. I could add that as well as another non-YA book, I suppose, and take the OC list up to a top ten… I love YA, as you know, but I’ve been a bit concerned that my OC list is imbalanced. Should I care, though?! I mean, should I truly care, or should I stop giving a shit and chill about the balance of books on my OC list?

Theoretically, as I’ve finished The People’s Songs, another non-fiction needs to go on there. Currently, I have Pet Shop Boys, Literally, by Chris Heath, and Nul Points, by Tim Moore, as my non-fiction helpings. The Saffron Trail and The Tobacconist are general fiction, but then I have FOUR young adult books!

But should I take a book or two OFF the list? I mean, if I’ve not read one of them for a while, is it really an ongoing concern? Do I just drop it from the OC list and just regard it as one of my half-read books and pick it up again some other time in the hope my interest in it will be revived? Finding Audrey, for example. This book has been untouched on my OC list, remaining at 29% for as long as I’ve had an OC list, really, and keeps getting overtaken by other books, so should I just put it on the back burner for now and drop it from the OC list, or should I pick it back up and try to get back into it? I WAS enjoying it, but then other books just came along and took my attention away from it.

The “Prodigal Books” which were missing, but recently found again, probably should join the OC list soon, as a celebration of them being relocated! As you will recall, four out of the five missing books happened to be in part of my wardrobe. I still don’t have a Scooby what happened to The God of Small Things, though! I guess it’s just AWOL. Maybe it’ll turn up when I’m looking for something else, which is the way of things around here!

Talking of looking for something else, we return to the conundrum of the OC List (as opposed to the Conundrum which is the last round on the long-running Channel 4 quiz show, Countdown, where the contestants have to guess the 9-letter anagram) – perhaps we could have some more non-fiction and I’ve got a couple of chunky books here of the history variety – I’m thinking about when I’m back at Manchester Crown Court next week for my second week of jury service… hence the chunkies! I’ve got A History of Modern Britain, by Andrew Marr, and 1000 Years of Annoying the French, by Stephen Clarke, and that one has been on the bookshelf outside my room, on the landing, for seemingly donkey’s years – at least since my mum actually bought and assembled that particular set of bookshelves! You may well know Stephen Clarke best for the “Merde” series of novels, which started with A Year In the Merde.

Of those two, I’m leaning towards the thousand years of annoying the French, but perhaps it’s time for a bit of Bill Bryson. Stuart Maconie might have just come off the OC list, but there are several books here by one of my other favourites of the non-fiction world and they need reading! On the landing, along with the Stephen Clarke book about annoying our continental neighbours, lol, are a couple of Bryson hardbacks – A Short History of Nearly Everything, and At Home, so I could always opt for one of those, or go with one of the paperbacks lurking around in here. So spoilt for choice and that’s just one author! If I come to a decision, I shall let you know!

In the meantime, it’s time I got this saved and published, so until the next blog brings you further details of my jury service book marathon, lol, take care and Happy Reading!

Joanne x x x

Books mentioned in this blog entry…

  • The Saffron Trail – Rosanna Ley
  • City of Bones – Cassandra Clare
  • The Tobacconist – Robert Seethaler
  • The People’s Songs – Stuart Maconie
  • I’d Tell You I Love You, But Then I’d Have To Kill You – Ally Carter
  • Pet Shop Boys, Literally – Chris Heath
  • Nul Points – Tim Moore
  • Finding Audrey – Sophie Kinsella
  • The God of Small Things – Arundhati Roy
  • A History of Modern Britain – Andrew Marr
  • 1000 Years of Annoying the French – Stephen Clarke
  • A Year In the Merde – Stephen Clarke
  • A Short History of Nearly Everything – Bill Bryson
  • At Home – Bill Bryson

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Filed under Authors, Books, Goodreads, Handbag Books, Humour, Music, Non-Fiction, Ongoing Concerns, Television, The TBR Pile, Travel, YA Books

Love In The First Degree

An Equal Music finished 18 April 2017

Good evening, fellow Bookworms!

First day of jury service done and dusted, and very successful on the book front as I wasn’t called to serve on any of the four juries for which they were selecting people today. I have phoned up, and I am not needed tomorrow, so I just need to phone again after 6pm tomorrow to see if I am needed on Thursday. Otherwise, I have a day off. I still plan on reading, though! I am seeing this whole jury service thing as a major opportunity to get through a lot of books!

An Equal Music is now finished! Yep, the orchestra has played the final chord on that one, and it was a mostly-enjoyable read, although some bits puzzled me, as in wondering if they led to anything or if I needed to remember that little detail, was it really significant to the plot? Having finished a work of fiction with a musical theme, I then decided to make further progress with a non-fiction book on music – Stuart Maconie‘s The People’s Songs. That’s now up to 59% in Goodreads terms.

As I said in the previous blog, I feel a pull towards more non-fiction on my Ongoing Concerns list, and I am thinking of adding Tim Moore‘s Nul Points to the collection. It’s a partially-read non-fiction book about acts which have failed on an epic scale at the Eurovision Song Contest! Acts which did not receive a single vote from a single country! It goes up to 2005, so, yes, it’s a bit old now, but should be a good read and it is coming up to the Eurovision time of year anyway, so good timing, I think! I was up to page 98 the last time I read it and that is out of 378, so we’d be talking over 25% when I check Goodreads and then put it on my OC Board and in my handbag to take around with me.

* marks the book as currently reading and that she is on page 98 of 378, and Goodreads has informed her that she has read 26% of the book thus far… *

The other books mentioned the other day, on the non-fiction front, are still possibilities for the OC list in the very near future, but we shall go with Nul Points with Eurovision on the horizon.

Wind in the Willows 8 Editions

After we had been informed, this afternoon, that we were no longer required to stay, I left the courts and headed for Waterstone’s. Yeah, I know… you’re so gobsmacked about that, aren’t you?! NOT! Rather a good job I was in my natural habitat as I got a message from my mum asking me if I owned a copy of The Wind In the Willows, by Kenneth Grahame. Unfortunately, not something I have actually ever read, although I recall the animated TV adaptations on Children’s ITV in the 80s, with Mr Toad being voiced by the legend that is Sir David Jason. However, at the time of being messaged, I was in the children’s and young adults’ section at Waterstone’s so I offered to get a copy… and that is when I found out that the Deansgate branch boasted no fewer than EIGHT different editions of the classic children’s novel! I shit you not! EIGHT different editions of The Wind In the Willows! Weighing in at a range of prices from £5.99 to a whopping £16.99! See the above photo for the eight editions lined up!

I challenge any of you to find me ANY instance where ANY branch of ANY book shop, worldwide, has MORE than eight different editions of the same book! I think you’d be hard-pushed to beat eight different editions of Kenneth Grahame‘s novel at Waterstone’s Deansgate in Manchester!

Wind in the Willows 2

I bought the Oxford Children’s Classics edition on the right in this photo.

There are still seven different editions left at that branch, although I did buy a copy. It’s for the Junior Bookworm, Charlotte. Looks like they’ll be reading it at school. I expect schools still do have multiple copies of certain books, but I know my niece and what she’s like with books. I know she’ll want one of her own! I also saw another interesting book while I was in the children’s department, The Bookshop Girl, by Sylvia Bishop, which might also appeal to my niece.

On the YA front, I admit I am still after Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe, and have not seen a copy in store yet. I might just have to bite the bullet and get it ordered some time. but I saw yet another book whose title made me think of a song (I’m often finding books which do that for me, lol!) – The Bombs That Brought Us Together, by Brian Conaghan. I am pretty convinced the title is inspired by lyrics from “Ask” by The Smiths, although slightly paraphrased from the original words of Morrissey…

So ask me, ask me, ask me!

Ask me, ask me, ask me

Because if it’s not love, then it’s the bomb, the bomb, the bomb, the bomb, the bomb the bomb…

The bomb that will bring us together.

See? Definitely inspired by Smiths lyrics if you ask me! (See what I did there?!) The title of this blog, however, is from a Bananarama song, lol! I just wanted the title of a song on a “legal” theme given that I’m on jury service! I know I’m not needed tomorrow (well, actually today as it’s just gone midnight here as I type), but I have to phone up later and see if my presence is required on Thursday. In the meantime, the reading marathon will continue!

Well, I think I’d better either get on with some reading or catch up on Pointless! Perhaps I should delete some or I’ll never get round to watching them. I think they’re repeats anyway – pretty sure I’ve seen some of the contestants before! It’s very hard, with quiz shows, to know if they’re running a current series, or just old ones, especially when they’re on every weekday, and with Pointless Celebrities on Saturdays! (I can think of a lot of “celebs” these days whom I would regard as pointless, lol!) In Pointless, of course, the whole aim of the game is to score 0 points, which is the exact opposite of the Eurovision Song Contest! And with that, I shall get this published and return to Nul Points! Until the next blog, take care and Happy Reading!

Joanne x x x

Books mentioned in this blog entry…

  • An Equal Music – Vikram Seth
  • The People’s Songs – Stuart Maconie
  • Nul Points – Tim Moore
  • The Wind In the Willows – Kenneth Grahame
  • The Bookshop Girl – Sylvia Bishop
  • Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe – Benjamin Alire Sáenz
  • The Bombs That Brought Us Together – Brian Conaghan

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Filed under Books, Childrens' Books, Goodreads, Half-Finished Books, Handbag Books, Humour, Junior Bookworms, Music, My Bookworm History, Ongoing Concerns, Television, YA Books

Get The Balance Right

Zlatan book finished April 2017

Hello again, fellow Bookworms!

As you can see, Zlatan is at 100% Yes, another book completed in 2017! Number 18 for this year on the Goodreads Challenge, and thus OFF the list of Ongoing Concerns! Mr Ibrahimović‘s autobiography will now be handed over to my sister so she can read it. I believe in marking off my OCs as being 100% read on my board before I take them off the list and move other books up.

I was dithering about what to add next, other than knowing it really should be some non-fiction to replace the non-fiction I have just finished, but then I remembered that blog from a couple of months ago about my half-finished tour biography of the Pet Shop Boys, and that I’d said on here I was going to finish that book as part of my celebrations of having been a Pethead for 30 years this year! Therefore, Pet Shop Boys, Literally, by Chris Heath, joins the OCs! As I said at the time, the book is already 50% read, so it is literally a Half-Read Book! It joins the list somewhere in the middle. An Equal Music, by Vikram Seth, resumes top spot on 78% now that our Swedish hero is off the list.

So, we’re back to 9 books on the OC List, of which 7 are fiction and 2 are non-fiction, bringing us on to the matter at hand and the title of tonight’s blog, which is, of course, a song by Depeche Mode, as fans of 80s music will no doubt know! The issue being that I feel I need a better balance between fiction and non-fiction on my list. The factual stuff is being outnumbered, which doesn’t seem very fair as I enjoy a good factual read as much as I enjoy a good story! Always have done since I was a kid! I am thinking, therefore, that even if the next one or two books to be finished and come off the OC list are fiction, they will be replaced on there by factual tomes! I feel I should have at least 3, if not 4, non-fiction books if I’m going to have 8 or 9 books on the OC list as a whole. It needs to be more even!

Once that is up and running, and I do have a better balance, we can have like-for-like books coming off the “substitutes’ bench” so to speak. I can certainly see some Bill Bryson being added to the OC list in the near future. I had thought about Mother Tongue, but that might not go on the OC list, as I was so near to finishing that book when I last read it that it would not take much to get it finished off, thus there is very little point in adding it to the list for just a day or two! Like with the really quick reads, I see very little point in adding certain books to the OC List – an Ongoing Concern is a book that’s going to take me more than a day or two to read, or to finish off if it is already partially-read!

There WILL be some Bryson, and it will happen fairly soon, but it’s more likely to be Down Under, Neither Here Nor There, or The Road To Little Dribbling which is added to the OC List when I need another dose of non-fiction adding to it. There will be at least a bit more Stuart Maconie, too. I have Hope & Glory lined up to be read at some point once I’ve finished The People’s Songs. I’m going to have to look to see if I own a copy of Cider With Roadies, also by Maconie, and I hope I do! He also wrote a book called Adventures On the High Teas, but I don’t own a copy of that at present. No rush as yet – let’s get my existing Maconie books read first!

John Cleese‘s autobiography, So, Anyway, is lurking in an accessible part of my room, on one of my book piles, so that is another distinct possibility! Should be pretty funny knowing Cleese! It would also be the perfect excuse to make plenty of Monty Python references in this blog. Not that I need an excuse to go all Pythonesque on you, lol!

What do we have here, lurking around Computer Corner? Hmmm…. Maarten Meijer‘s biography of Louis van Gaal, one of my half-read books. I liked Louis and wish he’d been retained to see out his three years. I still don’t like Jose Mourinho. At all. Yeah, alright, he’s good in the transfer market, but the cons outweigh the pros, and he really should STOP criticising players in public! That is NOT the United way! It is also crap man-management! If you have to give a player a bollocking, you do it in private, in your office! That’s how Fergie did it, and that’s why he was so successful! 26 and a half years as our manager, 13 league titles, 5 FA Cups, 4 League Cups, 1 European Cup-Winners’ Cup and 2 European Cups… and his reign only came to an end due to retirement.

Fergie defended his players in public, even at the expense of the media giving him a load of shit for it, but that is how he retained their loyalty and got so much out of them. He NEVER rubbished his players in the press or on telly! Also, he knew the players should get the credit and the attention far more than him, and he accepted that! Jose needs to stop being such an arrogant, egotistical little twat!

There is only one person on earth I can think of with an ego even bigger than that of Jose Mourinho, and that is a certain Tango-tinted twat who is, unfortunately, currently residing in the White House…

I would say that Jose has all the man-management skills of a dead gnat, but that would be far too harsh on the poor gnat!

Anyway, enough about that arrogant arsehole, and back to the books…

Also lurking near Computer Corner, we have The Year of Reading Dangerously, by Andy Miller. This has been one of the notorious Duplicate Books, of course, but one copy is being offloaded soon. However, that still means I will have one copy for my reading pleasure when I eventually get around to it. We also have How To Teach Quantum Physics To Your Dog, by Chad Orzel. I know bugger all about quantum physics, I only got a D for bog standard physics when I did my GCSEs at high school, lol, and that was way back in 1989, 28 years ago, but maybe reading this would help me understand more scientific stuff in an entertaining way?

I wasn’t completely useless at science, unlike PE, but I wasn’t brilliant at it either. My dad was the scientific bod in our family – my best subjects at high school were music and foreign languages, followed fairly closely by history and literature.

Still on the science books front, there’s a partially-read copy of Periodic Tales, by Hugh Aldersey-Williams, which I think is downstairs in our living room. I could always resume that one if my quest for more non-fiction and a more even balance of reading matter on my OC list calls for more science, although that would be chemistry, not physics. Chemistry really would be my dad’s area of expertise! However, as I’ve mentioned in previous blogs, one area of interest for me, which my dad got me into when I was young, is volcanoes, so I could always get round to reading Krakatoa: The Day The World Exploded, by Simon Winchester. A tiny little bit of it has been read, some time ago, but only about the first 11 pages, so we can start again from scratch, really.

Anyway, I think that has drawn up a decent list of non-fiction ideas for future additions to the OC List when I need factual reads to be added! It also brings to an end this blog entry, so I shall get it finished off and published. Until next time, take care, have a Happy Easter, and Happy Reading!

Joanne x x x

Books mentioned in this blog entry…

  • I Am Zlatan Ibrahimović – Zlatan Ibrahimović
  • Pet Shop Boys, Literally – Chris Heath
  • An Equal Music – Vikram Seth
  • Mother Tongue – Bill Bryson
  • Down Under – Bill Bryson
  • Neither Here Nor There – Bill Bryson
  • The Road To Little Dribbling – Bill Bryson
  • Hope & Glory – Stuart Maconie
  • The People’s Songs – Stuart Maconie
  • Cider With Roadies – Stuart Maconie
  • Adventures On the High Teas – Stuart Maconie
  • So, Anyway – John Cleese
  • Louis van Gaal: The Biography – Maarten Meijer
  • The Year of Reading Dangerously – Andy Miller
  • How To Teach Quantum Physics To Your Dog – Chad Orzel
  • Periodic Tales – Hugh Aldersey-Williams
  • Krakatoa: The Day The World Exploded – Simon Winchester

 

 

 

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Filed under Arsehole Politicians, Autobiography/Biography, Books, Computer Corner, Duplicate Books List, Football, Goodreads, Half-Finished Books, Handbag Books, Humour, Music, Non-Fiction, Ongoing Concerns, Rants, Sports, Travel, Volcanoes, YA Books

Four Out of Five Ain’t Bad!

Missing books found Bookstagram pic

“Don’t be sad, ’cause four outta five ain’t bad!”

Good evening, fellow Bookworms!

Good Friday today, and a very good Friday it is, too, as yours truly has found FOUR of her missing books! Meatloaf sang that two outta three ain’t bad, which is a fair point, lol, but when you’re a bookworm, and you find all but one of your notorious Missing Books, then four outta five is pretty decent, too!

Missing books found 14 April 2017

I shifted the bags in front of one of my wardrobe units to see which books were in that part, and, sure enough, four of the five missing books were there, as shown above. We have Thirteen Reasons Why, by Jay Asher, All The Light We Cannot See, by Anthony Doerr (thus also on the Duplicate Books List), A Man Called Ove, by Fredrik Backman, and The English Patient, by Michael Ondaatje. So, the only book still AWOL is The God of Small Things, by Arundhati Roy, and I really do not have a Scooby where the hell that one could have disappeared to! Not seen it for bloody ages! Used to be here in Computer Corner, but has not been here for quite some time now! Maybe I did offload it in a charity shop giveaway the other year? I don’t think I did, but I can’t be sure!

Found a few others in there, of which some I have made a mental note of their location, and others have been replaced in the wardrobe so that they can be in a more prominent place. Firmin, by Sam Savage, is one of the books I have got out to have available. A half-finished book, one of many, lol, it’s about a rat who lives in a bookstore. Ella Minnow Pea, another book about books, or at least about words, by Mark Dunn, is one of the others I have retrieved.

I have also found my very old, and sellotaped-together-many-times, copy of The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole aged 13 3/4, by the late great Sue Townsend, which is fairly apt as Adrian, as a fictional character, has recently celebrated his Big 50! Dunno where The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole is, though, as I thought those two were together, but it’ll crop up some time… I know I have definitely not got rid of it. I wouldn’t. Those first two Adrian Mole books are pretty special to me and go back years with me to when I was about 11 or 12!

Some books, including most of the notorious Duplicate Books List, are now in bags as I am starting to get books together for the clear-out. One copy of All The Light We Cannot See will have to join them. The other books from the Missing Books list have not been duplicated, so they’re all staying now that I’ve found them. Actually, I’ll keep my original of the Doerr novel, and give my recently-bought copy to a charity shop or the church summer fair or something. I did pick up a charity shop bargain the other day, though, but with several books due to leave this room in the very near future, I figured that the 75p acquisition of I’d Tell You I Love You, But Then I’d Have To Kill You, by Ally Carter, wasn’t going to cause a serious problem in the grand scheme of things! It’s the first book in the Gallagher Girls series, about girls at a school for spies, and I do have it on my Kindle, but I only count books as duplicated if I have more than one physical copy of the book, and this is not the case for the Ally Carter book.

E-books don’t take up physical space, so it doesn’t matter to me if I have the same book as a paperback and on my Kindle as well. In fact, that is the case for a few books of mine, and sometimes it has been very deliberate, such as last year when I got A Little Life for my Kindle, already having the paperback. This is because I wanted to get some of it read on the way to Wembley, but there was no way in Hell that I was going to lug a 720 page epic novel down to the FA Cup Final and back with me, so I got it in e-book format so I could get some of it read on the way down to see United beat Crystal Palace 2-1 in extra-time last May!

[Football Fan Bookworm Problems: When you’re reading a huge epic novel and want to get on with it, but your team is in the FA Cup Final and you don’t want to lug a huge chunky paperback to Wembley and back with you…]

I had other paperbacks as Handbag Books, alongside my Kindle, and also got The Reader On the 6.27, by Jean-Paul Didierlaurent finished off while I was on the coach to Wembley for that final. Can’t remember offhand which other books I took to Wembley with me, so you’ll just have to find my blogs from May and June 2016, as those should give you some clues!

Read a bit more of The Tobacconist earlier, so I’m now on for page 50, which is 21% of the book according to Goodreads. I’m going to have to figure out what to do with the books I have found today. I had started three of the missing books – Thirteen Reasons Why, The English Patient, and A Man Called Ove, and I was a good way through Firmin when I was reading it some time ago. Maybe they could have priority to join the Ongoing Concerns?

Firmin certainly deserves to be finished, I think, rather like the way I finally got Jamrach’s Menagerie finished off this year, when I’d started that one some years ago but then left it half-read for a while for whatever reason… Probably a bout of the dreaded Reader’s Block, I expect.

My friend Liz in Alberta is not happy about the weather, and I don’t blame her in the slightest! If the weather in Canada could kindly remember that it’s supposed to be Easter at the moment, not bloody Christmas, that would be great! Ta very much! The weather here could do with being a bit better, but it’s just bog standard British bank holiday weather, really, and at least it’s not bloody snowing on this side of the “Big Bathtub”! If you’re over in Canada and up to your eyeballs in snow at the moment, I suggest you get yourself a big mug of coffee and have a good read! Talking of Canada and coffee, I was delighted to learn that Tim Horton’s is opening branches here in the UK very soon! The first one will open in May up in Glasgow, so I hope there’s at least one branch here in Manchester pretty soon! I want a box of Timbits! Not had them since I was over in Canada on holiday in October 2009!

Well, I’d better get this finished off before I start wittering on about Timbits and make myself hungry, lol! Until next time, take care and Happy Reading!

Joanne x x x

Books mentioned in this blog entry…

  • Thirteen Reasons Why – Jay Asher
  • All The Light We Cannot See – Anthony Doerr
  • A Man Called Ove – Fredrik Backman
  • The English Patient – Michael Ondaatje
  • The God of Small Things – Arundhati Roy
  • Firmin – Sam Savage
  • Ella Minnow Pea – Mark Dunn
  • The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole aged 13 3/4 – Sue Townsend
  • The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole – Sue Townsend
  • I’d Tell You I Love You, But Then I’d Have To Kill You – Ally Carter
  • A Little Life – Hanya Yanagihara
  • The Reader On the 6.27 – Jean-Paul Didierlaurent
  • The Tobacconist – Robert Seethaler
  • Jamrach’s Menagerie – Carol Birch

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Filed under Books, Books About Books, Charity Shop Bargains, Duplicate Books List, Food & Drink, Football, Goodreads, Half-Finished Books, Handbag Books, Music, Ongoing Concerns, Reader's Block, Travel, YA Books